Dear Students:

 

It is my privilege and honor to be working with you again this year at Brashear High School.  I am excited to build new relationships and work with each of you as you develop effective habits to reach your highest potential.  It is my sincere belief that all students can learn and that by working together we can ensure a positive learning environment for everyone!

 

In achieving your best, this handbook provides you with valuable information to help you be successful at school.  Please read and become familiar with all policies and procedures that are contained within it.  We are fortunate to have a strong teaching and support staff that is committed to helping you achieve your highest potential.  It is our desire to help you grow and develop the habits of an effective person.

 

I want to wish you all the best of luck this school year.  If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to ask a staff member or myself.

 

Sincerely,

Brent Doolin

High School Principal

 

 

 

ADAIR COUNTY R-II

HIGH SCHOOL

205 West Dewey St.

Brashear, MO 63533

Phone:  (660) 323-5272

Fax:  (660) 323-5250

 

 

 

 

 

 

MISSION STATEMENT

“Building Leaders Who Learn, Laugh, Love and Leave A Legacy

 

              We Believe that in a

           democRratic society,

             educAtion must help the

        Students realize

         tHeir worth as individuals and

   should lead thEm toward becoming

        A productive

          MembeR of society.

 

 

 

ADMINISTRATION

 

Shelly Shipman........................... Superintendent

Brent Doolin................................ K-12 Principal

Renee Reeves............. Superintendent Secretary

Chandi March............................. K-12 Secretary

 

 

 

 

 

BOARD OF EDUCATION

 

Traci Hill......................... President of the Board

James Reeves............................... Vice President

Duayne Housman................................. Secretary

Alissa Garlock..................................... Treasurer

Jason Taylor................................ Board Member

Aaron Zentz................................ Board Member

Keith Turner.......................................... Delegate

 

 

 

RENAISSANCE PROGRAM

 

The purpose of the Renaissance program is to recognize students who are achieving academic excellence with tangible incentives, rewards, and recognition.  This program has some 800 schools across this country involved in a rebirth in education.

 

This program was started in Conway, South Carolina, several years ago and picked up by Josten's as a means to promote academic excellence.  Renaissance takes the incentive program from business and ties it to education.  It is an attempt to motivate all students to strive for excellence with a new commitment to their academic endeavors.  Renaissance is more than a program, it is an attitude that everyone can achieve excellence.

 

If we are going to compete as a nation in the 21st century we must get our young people to strive for excellence today.  Our students are 24% of our population, but they are 100% of our future.  The merging of business with education shall bring this nation to its rightful place in the competitive world.  The symbol of this new Renaissance is the American Eagle.  If we are to soar with the eagles we must complete this Renaissance -- the rebirth, renovation, restoration, refurbishment and renewal of our commitment to excellence in education.

 

(i)Make the Most of
(a)Your Opportunities
 
 

 

 

 


 

 

 


RENAISSANCE REQUIREMENTS

 

Gold Criteria

 

10.7 -11.00GPA

 

 

 

No F's

No unexcused tardies

No discipline referrals

             (of any kind)

 

 

RENAISSANCE SPONSORS

 

Colton’s Steakhouse

 

Burger King

 

Keller Estate

 

McDonald’s

 

 

 

THANKS FOR YOUR SUPPORT

 

 

RENAISSANCE REQUIREMENTS

 

Silver Criteria

 

9.0 GPA

No F's

No more than 2 tardies

No discipline referrals

   (of any kind)

 

 

RENAISSANCE SPONSORS

 

Wendy’s Old Fashioned

Hamburgers

 

Subway

 

Sonic

 

Back Roads Bar & Grill

 

 

THANKS FOR YOUR SUPPORT

 

 

RENAISSANCE REQUIREMENTS

 

Bronze Criteria

 

GPA Increase of 1.0 or more or 7.0 GPA for 2 consecutive semesters

 

No F's

No more than 4 tardies

No discipline referrals

   (of any kind)

 

RENAISSANCE SPONSORS

 

Pagliai’s Pizza

 

Bellacino’s/TCBY

 

Downtown Cinema 8

 

Pizza Hauz

 

Domino’s Pizza

 

 

THANKS FOR YOUR SUPPOR


 

SCHOOL CALENDAR

 

Aug. 17.................................. First Day of Classes

 

Sept. 5................................. Labor Day/No School

 

Sept. 16................... Dismiss Early 1:15/In-Service

 

Sept. 23............................. All School Picture Day

 

Sept. 26-28.............. 2nd & 7th grade OLSAT-8 Test

 

Oct. 14.................... Dismiss Early 1:15/In-Service

 

Oct. 14..................................... First Quarter Ends

 

Oct. 19 ........................... 11th  PSAT/NMSQT Test

 

Oct. 20......... Dismiss Early 1:15/P/T Conferences

 

Oct. 21.................................................. No School

 

Nov. 18................... Dismiss Early 1:15/In-Service

 

Nov. 23.................................... Dismiss Early 1:15

 

Nov. 24 & 25.................... Thanksgiving Vacation

 

Dec. 8-9.................................................. EOC Test

 

Dec. 20..................................... Dismiss Early 1:15

 

Dec. 20.................................. First Semester Ends

 

Dec. 21-Jan. 2............................. Christmas Break

 

Jan. 3........................................... School Resumes

 

Jan. 16........... MLK Day/No School/Snow Day #1

 

Jan. 20..................... Dismiss Early 1:15/In-Service

 

Feb 15............................. 11th Grade ASVAB Test

 

Feb. 17.................... Dismiss Early 1:15/In-Service

 

Feb. 20....................... President’s Day/No School

 

Mar. 8.................................... Third Quarter Ends

 

Mar. 17................... Dismiss Early 1:15/In-Service

 

Mar. 20........................... No School/Spring Break

 

Mar. 21..... No School/Spring Break/Snow Day #2

 

March 27-May 5................ 3rd-8th grade MAP Test

 

March 27-May 5 .................................... EOC Test

 

Apr. 13...... No School/Easter Break/Snow Day #3

 

Apr. 14 & 17.................... No School/Easter Break

 

Apr. 18...... No School/Easter Break/Snow Day #4

 

Apr. 19 ................................ 11th Grade ACT Test

 

May 3 .......................... 11th Grade ACT Make-Up

 

May 16..... Dismiss Early 1:15/Last Day of School

 

May 17-18..................................... Snow Day #5-6

 

 

SCHOOL WIDE ASSESSMENT

Individuals UNDER twenty-one (21) years of age who have not completed an approved program are encouraged to contact the Screening Coordinator for further information regarding screening.  If the scheduled screening is appropriate for the individual, he/she is encouraged to participate.  If the scheduled screening is deemed inappropriate, then an individual screening program will be made available.

 

For more information contact:

Christy Grissom, Testing Coordinator

(660) 323-5272

christy_grissom@brashear.k12.mo.us

 

 

FACULTY

 

Jessie O’Dell.................................... Music/Spanish

 

Martha Reese............................................... Business

 

Tammy Wolter............................ Librarian/English

 

James Scudder......... Math/Physics/Comp Sci.

 

Erin Moots............................................................. Math

 

Tonya Wood.............................. Special Education

 

Jeffrey McHenry............................... Social Studies

 

James Rearick............................................... Science

 

Kelli Baker.................................................................. Art

 

Michael Killen.................... Industrial Technology

 

Diane McGinnis............................................. English

 

Chris Prewitt............. Physical Education/Health

 

Cheryl Reeves.................................. At-Risk/Health

 

Christy Grissom............................ K-12 Counselor

 

 

 

 

SUPPORT STAFF

 

Renee Reeves.................. Secretary/Bookkeeper

 

Chandi March.................................. K-12 Secretary

 

Karla Hettinger............................................ Secretary

 

Sheri Turner........................................................ Nurse

 

Cathy March...................... Head of Food Service

 

Darlene Withrow................................................. Cook

 

.................................................................................... Cook

 

Lisa Peterson....................................................... Cook

 

Ron Parrish........................ Head of Maintenance

 

Carl Garr....................................................... Custodian

 

Daniel Carpenter…………………Para-Professional

 

........................................................... Para-Professional

 

Karen Leffler............................... Para-Professional

 

Jeff McHenry............................................. Bus Driver

 

Lajeana Coin............................................. Bus Driver

 

Gary Clark………………………………………….Bus Driver

 

Gary Clark/Lajeana Coin.......... Vo-Tech Driver

 

 


TELEPHONE DIRECTORY

The Adair County R-II School has installed phones in each classroom for safety and educational purposes. 

You may use the following directory to make calls.  Voice mail will be available if the party is unable to

take your call at that time.

 

Superintendent

10

Speech Room

28

Bookkeeper

11

Guidance Counselor

29

K-12 Principal Secretary

12

Nurse

30

Physical Education

13

K-6 Resource Room

32

At-Risk/Health         

15

Parents As Teachers Room

33

Art Room

16

Sixth Grade    

34

7-12 Resource Room

17

Kitchen/Cafeteria

35

Business Room

18

H.S. English

36

K-12 Principal/AD

19

Social Studies Room

37

Kindergarten  

21

Math/Technology Director

38

First Grade

22

Library

39

Fifth Grade

23

Music Room

40

Second Grade

24

English/Spanish

41

Third Grade   

25

Math Room (Grades 7-10)

42

Fourth Grade 

26

Science Room

43

Industrial Arts Room

27

Reading Room

46

 

 

 

 

 

  

BACK TO SCHOOL

The Administration and Faculty of Brashear High School would like to welcome all students to the beginning of the 2016-2017 school year.  The primary purpose and function of our school system is to provide its students with the best education possible.  It is our hope that you will take advantage of all the opportunities available and gain all you possibly can from your high school education.

 

A WORD TO PARENTS

Our school system will function best when you, as parents, cooperate with the faculty by doing the following:

1.         See that your child attends school regularly and has sufficient time at home for rest and study.

2.         Read your child's report card carefully and react to it appropriately.

3.         Please read and study the information available concerning the policies of our school and help us in providing a quality education to our students.

 

DEVELOP POSITIVE REPUTATIONS

The manner in which you conduct yourself both at school and at home and work is a direct influence on the opinion that others develop about you.  It is very possible that the individuals that you come in contact with during your high school years could one day play a key role in your future employment opportunities.  Different circumstances call for different types of conduct.  Therefore, we must develop a sense of doing right by learning "when to do what".  People judge you, your parents, your friends, your school, and your home by your behavior.  Every person that you come in contact with is going to form an opinion of you.  Why not make it a GOOD ONE!!!

SHOW YOUR SCHOOL SPIRIT

You can develop pride not only in your high school but, more importantly, in yourself by striving to do the following:

1.         Help keep the building and grounds clean and attractive.

2.         Throw all paper and trash in appropriate containers.

3.         Do not commit an act that will reflect discredit upon your school.

4.         Walk quietly through the halls and do not talk or laugh in a boisterous manner.

5.         Be present and prepared each day and don’t be tardy.

6.         Always be courteous and friendly to teachers and other students in this and other schools.

7.         Try to take a special interest in at least one extra-curricular activity.

 

NHS SELECTION PROCESS

Membership in the National Honor Society is one of the highest honors that can be awarded to a high school student.  NHS has worked hard to bring the accomplishments of outstanding students to the attention of parents, teachers, peers, and community.  Chapters in more than 20,000 high schools across the nation strive to give practical meaning to the Society's goals of scholarship, leadership, service, and character.

 

According to national rules, selection to NHS is by a majority of a five-member faculty council.  These four ideals are considered as the basis for selection.  No student is inducted simply because of a high academic average.  The National Honor Society strives to recognize the total student; one who excels in all these areas. 

            SCHOLARSHIP: - 9.35 cumulative grade point average. (Cannot drop below 9.35 after induction.)

CHARACTER:  demonstrates honesty, upholds principles of morality and ethics, complies with school regulations, exemplifies desirable qualities of personality and shows courtesy, concern and respect for others.

            LEADERSHIP:  holds offices or positions of responsibility, conducts business efficiently and effectively, is reliable and dependable, promotes worthy school and community activities, inspires positive behavior in others and takes a constructive lead in the classroom and other school activities.

            SERVICE:  volunteers dependable and well-organized assistance, cheerfully renders requested service to the school, works well with others, is willing to take on difficult or inconspicuous responsibilities, participates in extra-curricular activities or community service activities and maintains a loyal school attitude.

Membership, however, is more than an honor.  It carries with it more than certain privileges.  It incurs a responsibility and an obligation to demonstrate those outstanding qualities that resulted in selection.

 

VISITORS

Adult visitors are always welcome at any time to visit school.  Non-adult visitors must be accompanied by their parent to remain at school. ALL students arriving late or leaving early must check in/out in the HS office.  Parents/guardians/visitors are reminded that they are to go to the HS office first to check in and must use the main entrance by the HS office to enter the building after 8:30 a.m.  Students must be signed out by their parent or legal guardian before they will be allowed to leave the building.

 

STUDENT INSURANCE

Student insurance will be offered at the beginning of the school year.  Insurance forms shall be returned directly to the company by the parent.

 

GET A RECEIPT

Any time money is paid to the school secretary for anything a receipt will be given.  Parents and students should keep these receipts until the close of school.

 

PROPER DRESS

Students are expected to dress in proper clothing at all times while in school as well as attending school functions.  Halter tops, tank tops with straps less than one inch wide, or T-shirts with obscene or any in-appropriate messages will not be allowed.  Clothing with tobacco, alcohol or any in-appropriate drug related messages or logo will not be allowed.  Sleeveless T-shirts may be worn but cannot be cut back past the seam of the sleeve.  “A” shirts may only be worn for athletic practices or extra-curricular activities outside of school.  Shorts and Skirts must be an appropriate length.  Any article of clothing deemed distracting by teachers or administration (such as those showing visible undergarments or excessive skin) will not be allowed.

 

MEDICATION POLICY

ALL students who take ANY KIND of medication (prescription or over-the-counter) must bring that medication to the respective office (elementary or high school) to be placed until such time specified by parent note (if over-the-counter) or doctor's orders (if prescription) to take that medication.  The office personnel will then dispense the medicine as directed.

 

All medication must be in original container and with the original prescription if ordered by a physician.  A parent note on exact time of dosage and amount of dosage must accompany an over-the-counter medicine.  Asthma inhalers must have the original prescription attached, but allowances will be made for students who must carry them on their person after proper notification is given in the office and recorded.

 

This policy is required by the Missouri Department of Health.  Board policy must also comply with this requirement.

 

TEXTBOOKS

Textbooks are furnished free to the elementary and secondary students.  Notebooks, paper, pencils, and other expendable materials are paid for by the student.  (See item number (3) in General Student Information.)

 

SCHOOL PLANNER

School Planners will be available to all students K-12 at no charge to the student.  We feel that the value of the planners as an organizational tool and means of communication between the school and home are well worth the investment.  Please see that your children get the maximum benefit from this daily planner.

 

PROMOTION REQUIREMENTS

FOR GRADES 7 & 8

Students must pass:  10 out of 14 semesters with 7 classes.  If the student does not meet these minimums, he/she must repeat the 7th or 8th grade.

GRADING SCALE

A   =  95-100               B+  =  87-89                C+  =  77-79                D+  =  67-69

A-  =  90-94                B   =  84-86                 C   =  74-76                 D   =  64-66

                                    B-  =  80-83                C-  =  70-73                D-  =  60-63

                                                                                                                        F    =  59 and below


GENERAL STUDENT INFORMATION

1.         Each day a bulletin will be issued from the high school office, announcing school related events and activities.  This will be read to the students and will be presented during second period and will be posted in the high school hallways.  Parents may also view the daily bulletin on the school web site at http:\\brashear.k12.mo.us.

2.         Each student entering Brashear School for the first time must present record of having been immunized against polio, diphtheria, measles, and any other disease as required by the State Department of Education or will not be allowed to attend.

3.         According to school law, marking or defacing any school property is punishable by expulsion.  Students who damage anything that belongs to the school are liable for the cost of repair or replacement.

4.         Lost articles should be turned in to the office.  If the articles are not claimed within a reasonable time period, they will be disposed of.

5.         When riding the bus to out-of-town activities, all students are under direct supervision of the sponsor.

6.         All players, cheerleaders or other participants are to ride the school bus to and from the activity.  Participants who wish to ride home with their parents may do so after signing out.  Parents wishing their child to ride home with another approved adult must submit their request in writing to an administrator BEFORE the bus has left Brashear School.  If for some reason this is not done, it is the option of the principal and coaches to keep a player from competition for a specified time or suspend the player completely.

7.         Any student in the hallways during class time must have in their possession a teacher-issued hall pass.

8.         No student shall smoke or use tobacco, alcohol or drugs (or have these in their possession) in the school buildings, or on the bus or the school grounds during regular school hours or at any school sponsored activity.

9.         Gambling will not be allowed at any time on buses or in the buildings.

10.       A telephone has been placed in the lobby of the high school building.  Students are to use this telephone for personal calls.  Other telephones in the school are for school business only.

11.       Only those people who are actually participating in out-of-school activities (track meets, academic contests, school sponsored field trips, etc.) will be excused from school.  Non-participating students will not be allowed to ride the bus to activities.

12.       The elementary school office and high school office is a place of business and for the conducting of school business.  Individuals not conducting school business should not be in the office.

13.       Students must bring a note from home, signed by parents or guardians, in order to be dismissed during the school day.

14.       A student shall not leave school before or during the school day or absent himself from any class without an office permit.  This permit is authorized only by a principal or superintendent, not a teacher.  An absence without such a permit will be considered truant.

15.       Students who have in-school/out of-school suspension may receive up to 100% credit for make-up work.  Students in ISS or OSS will not be allowed to participate in any school activity during the day of the ISS or OSS.

16.       There should be absolutely NO open drink containers (cans, cups, etc.) in the lockers or in the gym.

 

CLASS ACTIVITIES

1.         All activities must have a sponsor in attendance.

2.         All students are required to ride the school bus to and from activity.

3.         In order to participate in any school activity (parties, ball games, practices, dances, etc.) a student must attend school 4 full periods during that school day.  Students in ISS may not participate in school activities the day ISS is assigned.

4.         All functions of the class must be scheduled in the office.  The Principal reserves the right to either approve or disapprove each activity.  Date, time, and place will be at the discretion of the principal and sponsor.

5.         During any activity, school-like conduct is expected of all students.

6.         School dances will not exceed 4 per year plus the Junior-Senior Prom. All out of school guests must be approved by the superintendent/principal and must be in high school or under the age of 21.

 

CLASS ORGANIZATION

1.         The officers of each class shall be:  President, Vice President, Secretary, Treasurer, and a member of the student council.

2.         Class meetings will be held with your class sponsors.  The meetings should be conducted in an orderly manner according to parliamentary procedure.

3.         It shall be the duty of the class president to conduct all class meetings.  He should consult with the sponsor in advance of the meetings in preparation of the agenda.  The vice president will take charge of the meetings in absence of the president.

4.         The secretary is responsible for keeping a record of the minutes of the meetings and should have a copy of these minutes available if needed by the office.  He is also responsible for all correspondence necessary in connection with class business.

5.         The treasurer is responsible for keeping record of the class money.  A class treasurer book is provided for recording all receipts and expenditures.  ALL class funds are to be turned in to the office by the class treasurer.  Expenditures of class monies must have the approval of the sponsors, and cleared through the Superintendent's office.

6.         All school dances, except Junior-Senior prom are a function of the student council and must be approved by the Principal.

BUS CONDUCT

It is the goal of our school to provide safe transportation for students; therefore, it is necessary for the drivers, students, parents and school personnel to work in harmony to enforce these rules.  Conduct of students may be monitored by surveillance cameras.  This policy has been approved by the school board.

 

1.     To ensure safety, the driver must be totally in charge of the school bus.  Passengers must respond promptly to all instructions given.  Example of infraction:  Deliberately defiant/refusal to follow instructions given.

2.   The use of alcohol and tobacco products is strictly prohibited.  Example of infraction:  Smokeless tobacco, smoking, matches, lighters, drugs, or alcohol.

3.   Animals as well as glass containers are not permitted.

4.   Passengers must observe classroom conduct at all times.  Example of infraction:  Excessive horseplay, pushing, tripping, loud talking/undue noise, throwing objects, obscene/unacceptable language, gestures, remarks or literature.

5.   Do not attempt to get off or move about while the bus is in motion.  Example of infraction:  Arms, head, feet, objects out window, refusal to stay seated, standing/moving around, crawling under or over seats.

6.   Vandalism or tampering with bus equipment is prohibited.  Example of infraction:  broken window, cut seat or seat damage.

 

DRIVING CARS

Building principals have the authority to regulate student use of automobiles at school.  Use of school property for student parking purposes is a privilege that may be denied due to violation of District regulations and school policies.  Student vehicles parked on District property are subject to search by school officials where there is reason to believe a vehicle contains materials prohibited by District regulations.

 

If a student arranges his/her own transportation to and from school, or school-related activities, the school’s supervision of such student will not begin until the school has custody and control over that student (i.e. checked in by a designated representative of the school).

 

All students going to the area vocational school at Kirksville MUST ride the bus from the Brashear School to Kirksville and back.  If a student is required to drive in order to fulfill a Vo-Tech commitment, permission will be provided on a case by case basis.  Willful violation of this will result in possible removal from Vo-Tech school.

 

Students driving cars to school shall park them as soon as they arrive in the designated student parking lot east of the High School building.  Students are to leave cars parked until the end of the day.  Only with permission will the cars be permitted to leave the parking area before school is dismissed for the day.  This permission comes from the Principal's office.

 

A speed limit of ten (10) miles per hour is established for all motor vehicles operated on the school premises.  Drivers of all vehicles are not to pass parked school buses while pupils are being loaded and unloaded.  Extreme care is to be exercised by all drivers while operating vehicles on the school premises in order to insure the safety of all children.  Failure to comply with this policy will result in a suspension of driving privileges.

 

CLOSED NOON HOUR

Like many schools in the state with a lunch program, Brashear will have a closed noon hour.  This period will be longer than the regular periods to allow ample time to eat in staggered shifts.  The students start eating in the cafeteria at 10:55 and by 1:15 over 220 lunches have been served.  Twenty five minutes are provided each individual for lunchtime.

 

We will be offering participation in the breakfast program.  Buses will arrive at school early enough so all students will have time for breakfast if they choose to eat.  Prices for breakfast will be .85 cents for grades K-6, $1.10 for grades 7-12, and $1.35 for adults. 

 

Lunch accounts are paid by students on Monday morning for the week.  Prices for lunch will be $2.30 for grades K-6, $2.70 for grades 7-12, and $3.20 for adults.  Students must notify the kitchen if they plan to eat a second meal.  Cost of a second meal is $3.20. 

 

Parents with questions about the free or reduced breakfast/lunch program should contact the Superintendent's office.

 

LUNCHROOM RULES

1.         Crowding to the front in the lunch line will result in the student being sent to the end of the line.

2.         All lunch accounts are to be paid in the office on Monday mornings of each week, grades 7-12.  Lunch payments will be collected in elementary classrooms Monday mornings (grades K-6).

3.         Be quiet.  No loud talking, running or shoving.

4.         Elementary students should remain seated until the teacher is ready to leave.

5.         Students sit where there is a seat available.  After selecting a seat, stay put.  No changing seats.  No saving seats.

6.         When a 7-12 student finishes lunch he/she will remain seated in the cafeteria.  Students will not be allowed in the hallway after lunch because it disturbs the classes in session.

7.         Charging lunches will not be allowed.  Students who forget their lunch money will be allowed a 3 day grace period before they will not be allowed to eat.

8.         Any time money is paid to the school secretary, for anything, a receipt will be given.  Parents and students should keep these receipts until the close of school.

            *A receipt will be given for all meals paid in advance.

9.         NO GUM in the lunchroom.


FOOD ALLERGIES AND SNACK POLICY

 

In an effort to be sensitive to students with food allergies, the Brashear School will be continuing our policy on snacks. All snacks that are brought in to share must be store bought prepackaged food items. Homemade food items will not be served. Please avoid items that contain nuts or are manufactured in a facility that processes nuts when possible. Nut allergies are on the rise and many students suffer severe consequences to their exposure. Teachers will alert parents to other specific allergies in their classroom. This rule applies to daily snacks, as well as birthdays and special “party” occasions. We apologize for any inconveniences this will cause our families, however, we feel like it is in the best interest of our students.

 

Since lunch is eaten in the cafeteria, your child may bring peanut butter, peanuts, or nut products for lunch. We would encourage you to find an alternative food, but understand sometimes that is not possible. The cafeteria will provide a peanut butter alternative for sandwiches. The tables will be cleaned with soap, water and paper towels after each lunch.

 

CONTAGIOUS ILLNESS MANAGEMENT

Students with contagious illness should not be brought to school. Students should not come to school if during the previous 24 hours they exhibit any of the following symptoms:

·       A temperature of 100 degrees or greater

·       Vomiting or diarrhea

·       An unusual or unexplained rash, unrelenting and itchy

·       Persistent cough

·       Informed by doctor they are still contagious

Children with chicken pox are to remain home until they are no longer in the contagious stage. They may return to school when all lesions are crusted over.

 

VO-TECH STUDENTS

Students in grades 11-12 will be allowed to apply to attend vo-tech classes at the Kirksville Area Technical School.  A bus will run to and from KATC leaving at 7:40 am and returning in time for 4th hour.  Vo-tech students will be expected to attend classes at KATC even on days when BHS is out of school. The exceptions are:

When KATC does not have class (i.e. Spring Break), Vo-tech students will not be expected to be at BHS until

the beginning of 4th hour.

 

Students are not to drive to Vo-Tech without prior approval from Administration.

 

DUAL ENROLLMENT

Dual Enrollment courses are offered at Brashear High School through Moberly Area Community College.  Students may take these courses and receive college credit through MACC as well as high school credit through our school.  Courses cost $75.00 per credit hour (or $225.00 per three hour semester class).  Students are expected to pay for the classes in full at the time of enrollment.  Students will pay for only one semester worth of classes at a time.  Instructors and textbooks will be furnished by the district.  (Students may enroll in these classes for high school credit only at no charge.)  Students must test into these courses by showing a qualifying score on the ACT or COMPASS test prior to enrollment.  MACC will offer select online dual credit courses for $82.00 per credit hour (or $246 per three hour semester class). 

 

Classes offered for dual enrollment may include:

College Freshman English           Exposition                              American History I

American Literature I                   Sociology                                Western Civilization I & II

American Literature II                 Fine Arts Appreciation           College Algebra

College Trigonometry                  Chemistry                               Advanced Biology

Psychology                                   Advanced Government           Public Speaking

 

ACT ASSESSMENT

BHS is now a National Test Site.  To take the test here put site code 239-110 on your registration. 

 

Test Date

Registration Deadline

(Late Fee Required)

September 10, 2016

August 5, 2016

August 6-August 19, 2016

October 22, 2016

September 16, 2016

September 17–September 30, 2016

December 10,  2016

November 4, 2016

November 5-18, 2016

February 11, 2017

January 13, 2017

January 14-20, 2017

April 8, 2017

March 3, 2017

March 4-17, 2017

June 10, 2017

May 5, 2017

May 6-19, 2017

 

DISTRIBUTION OF NON-CURRICULAR

 STUDENT PUBLICATIONS

Students may not distribute unofficial written material, which is obscene, libelous, vulgar/indecent, harassing/demeaning, or which causes a substantial disruption of school.

 

Anyone wishing to distribute written material must first submit for approval a copy of the material to the principal/designee at least three (3) days in advance of desired distribution time with the following information:  name and phone number of person submitting request, date and time of intended display, location where material will be displayed, and grade of students to whom the display is intended.  Within 48 hours the principal will render a decision on whether the material will be displayed.  To receive a copy of the complete document on student publications, inquire in the office of administration during regular school hours.

 

WEIGHTED GRADE SYSTEM

The primary purpose of the weighted grade system is to assist in calculating class rank based upon courses recognized as college preparatory.  Most colleges consider class rank as a critical factor in determining a student’s admission.

 

The weighted grade system awards more points for difficult academic courses.  A 20% exact calculation will be given to the weighted classes.

 

A  =  13.2                    B+ =  10.8                   C+ =  7.2                     D+ =  3.6

A- = 12                        B   =    9.6                   C   =  6                        D   =  2.4

                                    B-  =   8.4                    C-  =  4.8                     D-  =  1.2

 

Because the following courses demand a high level of written communication skills, problem solving, and creative thinking abilities, they are considered weighted:

Algebra II                                         Physics                                       Pre-Calculus

Chemistry                                        Advanced Biology                     Accounting

Sociology                                                                                            Advanced Government

                                                        

All classes offered for dual enrollment will be weighted.  Any classes offered for dual enrollment but not taught for dual enrollment will remain weighted.  Dual enrollment classes may include but are not limited to the following:

Exposition                                                                                          College English

American Literature I & II              Public Speaking                         American History I & II

College Algebra                              Chemistry                                  Western Civilization I & II

College Trigonometry                     Sociology                                   Advanced Government

Psychology                                      Fine Arts Appreciation              Advanced Biology

 

MoVIP (Missouri Virtual Instruction Program) offers Advanced Placement courses that will be certified by College Board and taught by AP certified teachers.  These courses are recognized as allowing students to access higher-level courses and will be accepted as weighted courses.  Other MoVIP or approved distance learning courses that have course and content comparable to weighted courses (i.e. Algebra II, Physics, Chemistry, etc) will be considered weighted.  The above list is not necessarily all-inclusive as course titles and offerings may vary from year to year.  Each year the list of course offerings for weighted and dual enrollment courses will be approved by Board action.

STUDENT A+ ELIGIBILITY

For a student to be eligible for the financial incentives of the program, students must be certified as an A+ student by A+ Coordinator, Mrs. Cheryl Reeves, at BHS.  To be certified as an A+ student, an individual must do the following:

 

For more information or a full explanation of the above requirements, please contact Mrs. Cheryl Reeves, A+ Coordinator at (660) 323-5272.

 

SENIOR INTERNSHIP PROGRAM

What you should know about Internship…

Internship is an out of the classroom learning opportunity.  Demonstrating responsibility, communication skills, and maturity are essential to participate in this opportunity.  While in an internship position, you are expected to act as adult members of the community.  As an intern you may be paid or you may be working as a volunteer.  Compensation is at the mentor’s discretion.  Whether you are paid or not, interning is an educational activity.  The goal of interning is to provide you access to a learning environment outside the classroom.  Your internship must be related to your future career goals.

 

I.          Class offered to BHS seniors

A.        Year-long Internship/Apprenticeship

II.         Requirements - Students must:

            A.        Express a sincere interest in a career choice and complete an application.

            B.        Sign a contract and have parent signature also.

III.       Class work - Students will:

            A.        Prepare resume

            B.        Prepare cover letter

            C.        Contact employer

            D.        Research job seeking skills

            E.         Research career choice

            F.         Research post-secondary education possibilities

IV.       Benefits - Students:

            A.        Gain “real world” experience

            B.        Learn from others

            C.        Gain better understanding of career choice

            D.        See need for additional post-secondary training

See School Counselor for Details

 

REPORT TO PARENTS

1.         Grade cards will be issued a few days following the end of the first, second and third quarters.  Fourth quarter grade cards will be mailed to students after fourth quarter finals.

 

2.         Progress reports are sent out each quarter after the 3rd and 6th week.  These reports need not be returned to the office.

 

3.         The following schedule of grades will be used:  A=Excellent, B=Superior, C=Average, D=Inferior and F=Failure.

 

4.         The honor roll is calculated at the end of each quarter and each semester.  To be eligible for the honor roll, a student must have a grade point of at least 7.000 to 9.999 for the "B" honor roll and 10.000 or greater for the "A" honor roll.  Any failing grade during the period that appears on the report card will cause the student not to make the honor roll.

 

5.         Parents can access their child’s grades using the “parent portal” of our Student Information System.  To gain access to the portal, parents must first sign a use of technology agreement.  Agreement contracts can be obtained in each office.  See Mrs. Grissom, SIS Coordinator, if you have questions.

 

 

 



2016-2017 Class Schedule

 

 

 

 

 

Instructor/Subject

Period 1

Period 2

Period 3

 

8:15-9:06

9:09-10:00

10:03-10:54

Kelli Baker

College Prep. Art

Design Theory

Elementary Art

Art

3-D Art                 (10-12)

Fiber Art (9-12)

 

Cheryl Reeves

A+

 

At-Risk

At-Risk

 

 

 

Martha Reese

#Accounting

Voc. Business

 

Business

 (11-12)

 (11-12)

 

PolyCom

 

 

 

Cooperative Classes

 

 

 

Michael Killen

Exploring IA

 

Woods I

Industrial Arts

 (9-12)

 

(9-12)

Diane McGinnis

 

Language Arts I

*#Public Speaking

Language Arts

 

(9-10)

*#American Lit (11-12)

Erin Moots

Integrated Math I

Algebra ½

Algebra I

Math

(9-12)

 

(9-10)

James Scudder

Computer Science

*#College Algebra(11-12)

Geometry

Math

(10-12)

*#College Trigonometry

(10-12)

Jessie O’Dell

Band

Elementary Music

Elementary Music

Music/Spanish

(9-12)

 

 

Chris Prewitt

Team Sports

 

Elementary PE

Physical Education

Lifetime Sports (10-12)

 

 

Tonya Wood

Resource

Resource

Resource

Resource

 

 

 

James Rearick

*#Chemistry

Biology (10)

Science 7

Science

(11-12)

 

 

Jeff McHenry

Social Studies 8

Social Studies 7

 

Social Studies

 

 

 

Tammy Wolter

English 7

Library

English 8

Library

 

 

 

*designates college dual enrollment classes

 

 

 

 

 

                             

 

2016-2017 Class Schedule

 

 

 

 

Period 4

Period 5

Period 6

Period 7

10:57-11:48

11:51-1:15

1:18-2:12

2:15-3:09

Elementary Art

 

  8A          8B

Drawing

 

 

  7A          7B

Painting (9-12)

Experimental

Health

S.T.A.T.S.

Careers 7

Science  (10-12)

(7-8)

(recommendation only)

Careers 8

Personal Finance(12)

Elementary

  8B          8A

Computer Applications

College Prep (12)

Keyboarding

  7B          7A

(9-12)

 

*#Psychology

 

 

 

*#Sociology  (MACC)

 

 

Drafting

Home Improvement

  7A          7B

Advanced Woods

(10-12)

Metals (10-12)

  8A          8B

(10-12)

Language Arts II

Language Arts III

Career English

App Communications/

(10-11)

 

(11-12)

Journalism (11-12)

Math 7

 

#Pre-Calculus

Integrated Math II

 

 

 

(10-11)

#Algebra II

#Physics

 

Technology Director

(11-12)

 

 

 

Elementary Band

Foreign Language

(10-12)

 

Band

 

 

 

(7-12)

Elementary PE

PE (7-8)

Health (9)

Weight Training

 

 

PE (9-12)

(10-12)

Resource

Resource

 

Special Education

 

 

 

Assistant Director

Science 8

Physical Science (9)

*#Advanced Biology

 

 

 

(11-12)

 

American History (9)

Government

World History (10)

*#Western Civ I

 

Current Events (10-12)

 

*#Western Civ II (11-12)

Library

Library

  7B          7A

Study Skills 8

 

 

  8B          8A

Study Skills 7

                                                                                         #designates weighted classes


Homework On Time (HOT) Program

Mission: To develop and foster the responsibility of our students and provide assistance to students who need help completing assignments and learning to manage the work load of our high school schedule.

 

What: Students completing less than 60% of their assignment will receive a HOT Sheet from their teacher.  That assignment is due by 8:15 the next day.  If a student fails to complete a HOT Sheet and doesn’t turn it in by 8:15 the next morning, the student will serve a mandatory after-school detention or before school detention the next morning.  If the assignment is not done and turned in by 8:15, the student will serve a full day of In School Suspension (after serving detention).  Completed Hot Sheet assignments may be awarded partial credit at the teacher discretion as long as the partial credit is not below 65%.  If any student shows a pattern of incomplete HOT sheets and is receiving excessive days in ISS, other interventions may include but are not limited to, mentoring, Saturday school, referral to the Juvenile Office, etc.

 

SCHOOL SONG

We’re going to fight tonight for Brashear High,

Our team is on the road to win,

Our team is on the road to victory,

And our hearts are in a spin Rah-Rah!

 

To the team we pledge our loyalty,

To the team who’ll fight right back,

To the senior (junior) high more honor be,

Because we wear the orange and black

 

B-B-BRA-S-S-SHE-E-E-EAR…..BRASHEAR!!

 

PARENT INVOLVEMENT POLICY

            The Board of Education recognizes the positive effects of parents/families’ involvement in education of their children.  The Board is committed to strong parent/family involvement in working collaboratively with district staff as knowledgeable partners in educating district students.  In order to implement the Board’s commitment to parent/family involvement in education, the Superintendent will appoint a committee of parents, staff, and community representatives to serve as the district’s Parent Involvement Committee.  The Committee’s responsibilities will include recommendations for program development, parent staff training and program evaluation.

 

LOCKER SEARCH

Student lockers are the property of the school district and remain at all times under the control of the district.  The district retains the right to inspect student lockers for any reason at any time without notice, without student consent, and without a search warrant.  Drug dogs may be used to search lockers, backpacks, purses and cars parked on the school premises.

 

DETENTION

Detention time will be served one hour after school (3:15-4:15) unless otherwise specified.  There will be no talking, sleeping, soda or use of cell phones or other electronic devices. If a student skips detention, they will serve 1 day of ISS.


JUNIOR-SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL

CO-CURRICULAR ACTIVITY PARTICIPATION REQUIREMENTS

Students must pass all subjects enrolled and maintain a 4.0 grade point average (on an 11 point scale) the previous quarter in order to participate in co-curricular activities to be district eligible.  All students' grades are to be reviewed every 3 weeks (progress report time) to see if they remain district eligible and can participate.  Students that receive a failing grade on a progress report will be on probation until he/she submits a grade check showing his/her grade is above a 60% in that course.  Students that fall below a 4.0 GPA at the 3-week grade check will be on probation.  During probation, students may participate in team activities but if that student's grade does not improve above 4.0 GPA at the second three-week grade check, that student will be district ineligible until the end of the quarter.  District ineligible students may be allowed to practice, and sit with the team during activities, but cannot participate in the event.  Students that are district ineligible cannot miss school time to attend events.

 

Students need only to meet state standards (must receive 3.0 units of credit or 80% of the maximum allowable credits which may be earned, whichever is greater) the first day of school to participate until the end of the first 3 week period at which time they must be district eligible.  A 4.0 may not be attained by rounding a lower number to reach 4.0.

 

            All I.D.E.A. and 504 students with an Individual Education Plan (IEP) will be exempt from the District Extra Curricular Activities Policy but will be held to the State Standards (must earn 3.0 units of credit or 80% of the maximum allowable credits which can be earned, whichever is greater, the previous semester.)

 

STUDENT PHYSICALS

Students must have a physical exam on file before they can participate in extra-curricular activities.  If the physical is received after February 1, it is good for the remainder of that school year plus the next whole school year (expiring on the last day of school).

 

TRI-COUNTY CONFERENCE

This year Brashear will again participate in the Tri-County Conference.  Conference sports consist of softball and baseball in the fall.  The winter sport is boys and girls basketball.  The spring activities are junior high and high school track and academic bowl.  Student athletes will be eligible for all-conference recognition in each sport, as voted on by conference coaches.  The senior high squads will compete for conference championships.  Member schools are:  Atlanta, Bevier, Brashear, Bucklin/Macon County, Green City, LaPlata, Linn County, Meadville and Novinger.

 

BRASHEAR TOURNAMENT

The 88th Annual Brashear Invitational Tournament will be held in the High School February 6-11, 2017. 

 

COOP JUNIOR HIGH FOOTBALL/SOFTBALL

This year, the Adair County R-II District will be partnering with Knox County R-I District to provide junior high students with the opportunity to play football and softball.  Because Knox County District will be head school, Adair County District will not be responsible for the student during these activities.  This includes transportation to and from practices and/or games.  Students are also responsible for any fees incurred.  Students interested need to contact the Knox County School at 397-2231.

 

 

 

 

 

BASEBALL/SOFTBALL SCHEDULE

Aug. 20                          Putnam Co. Tourney                  Away                           TBA

Aug.  23                         Newtown Harris (SB/BB)          Away                           5:00

Aug   25                         North Shelby (JV/V SB)            Away                           5:00

Aug.  26                         Linn County (SB/BB)                Home                           5:00

Aug.  27                         Novinger Baseball Tourney      Away                           TBA

Aug.  29                         Milan (JV/V SB)                         Home                           5:00

Aug.  30                         Knox County (JV/V SB)            Away                           5:00

Sept.   2                          Meadville(SB/BB)                      Away                           5:00

Sept.   6                          Novinger (SB/BB)                      Away                           5:00

Sept.   8                          Canton (JV/V SB)                       Home                           5:00

Sept.   9                          La Plata (SB/BB)                        Away                           5:00

Sept. 13                          Atlanta (SB/BB)                          Home                           5:00

Sept. 16                          Green City (SB/BB)                   Home                           5:00

Sept. 20                          Macon Co./Bucklin (SB/BB)    Away                           5:00

Sept. 23                          Bevier (SB/BB)                           Home                           5:00

Sept. 24                          Schuyler County V SB Tourney        Away                  TBA

Sept. 27                          Marion County(SB/BB)             Home                           5:00

Sept. 29                          Green City (V/JV SB)                Away                           5:00

TBA                                District Softball Tourney          TBA                             TBA

 

 

JUNIOR HIGH BASKETBALL SCHEDULE

Oct. 15-16                       Green City Tourney                         Away                    TBA

Oct.  17                            Atlanta                                                                         Home                                                                         6:00

Oct.  21                            Green City                                                                         Away                                                                         6:00

Oct.  24                            La Plata                                                                         Home                                                                         6:00

Oct.  25                            Bevier                                                                         Home                                                                         6:00

Oct.  28                            Bucklin/Macon Co.        Away                                                       6:00

Oct.  31                            Meadville                                                                         Away                                                                         6:00

Nov.   1                            Novinger                                                                         Home                                                                         6:00

Nov.   3                            Linn County                                                                         Away                                                                         6:00

Nov. 7-12                        Atlanta Tourney                                                                         Away                                                                         TBA

 

 

 

VARSITY BASKETBALL SCHEDULE

                              Nov. 21                           Marion County                                 Home                    6:00

                              Nov. 28-Dec. 3               Novinger Tourney                            Away                    TBA

                              Dec.   5                            Higbee                                                Away                    6:00

                              Dec.   6                            Linn County                                      Home                    6:00

                              Dec.   9                            Green City                                         Away                    6:00

                              Dec. 13                            La Plata                                              Away                    6:00

                              Dec. 15                            Atlanta                                               Home                    6:00

                              Dec. 16                            Meadville                                          Home                    6:00

                              Dec. 22                            Holiday Hoops @ Trenton             Away                    TBA

                              Jan.    5                            Marion County                                 Away                    6:00

                              Jan.    6                            North Shelby                                     Away                    6:00

                              Jan.  9-14                        Milan Tourney                                  Away                    TBA

                              Jan.  20                            Newtown Harris                               Away                    6:00

                              Jan.  24                            Green City                                         Home                    6:00

                              Jan.  27                            Milan                                                  Home                    6:00

                              Jan.  30                            Bevier                                                Away                    6:00

                              Feb.   3                             Keytesville                                        Home                    6:00

                              Feb.  6-11                        Brashear Tourney                            Home                    TBA

                              Feb.  14                           Bucklin/Macon Co.                          Home                    6:00

                              Feb.  16                           Novinger                                            Away                    6:00

                              TBA                                 District Basketball Tourney           TBA                     TBA                                       

 

 

ADAIR COUNTY R-II SCHOOL DISTRICT

Office of Administration

LETTERING POLICY ADOPTED FEBRUARY 1998

 

MUSIC

Band                  (Must meet both requirements)

                           1.  Attend 95% of all morning or evening rehearsals (esp. marching band).*

                           2.  Participate in all parades or one of the following:  All-Conference Band, All-District Band, or attend Jr. High or High School District Contest.

 

Chorus               (Must meet both requirements)

                           1.  Attend 95% of all before or after school practice.*

                           2.  Participate in al least one extra concert (meaning not those performed at school).  examples:  All-Conference Chorus, All-District Chorus, KTVO Heartland Chorus, NMSU Honors Choir, District Music Contest, etc.

 

SPORTS

Jr. High &         (Must meet both requirements)

Varsity               1.  Attend 95% of practices and events.*

Track                 2.  Be a member of the team at the end of that sport season.

 

Baseball &        (Must meet both requirements)

Softball              1.  Attend 95% of practices and events.*

                           2.  Be a member of the team at the end of that sport season.

 

Jr. High &         (Must meet both requirements)

Varsity               1.  Attend 95% of practices and events.*

Basketball         2.  Be a member of the team at the end of that sport season.

 

Jr. High &         (Must meet both requirements)

Varsity               1.  Attend 95% of practices and events.*

Cheerleader      2.  Be a member of the team at the end of that sport season.

 

ACADEMIC BOWL

Jr. High &         (Must meet both requirements)

Varsity               1.  Attend 95% of practices and events.*

                           2.  Be a member of the team at the end of the season.

 

*Attendance requirement for lettering is not affected when administration determines the "group" will not attend an event.  Attendance % is of all events at which the "group" participates.

**Any appeals will be considered on a case by case basis.

 

POSSIBLE AWARDS

Jr. High (gold)                                                       Varsity (gold)

1 Jr. High Letter                                                      1 Varsity Letter

1 Symbol per activity                                             1 Symbol per activity

3 bars maximum per activity                                4 bars maximum per activity

 


 

 

FIRE DRILL

As a safety precaution, and in accordance with the Missouri State School Laws, fire drills will be held during the school year.  The FIRE DRILL WILL BE ANNOUNCED OVER THE TELEPHONE INTERCOM system followed by a CONTINUOUS BELL.  Students will evacuate the building in a quiet and orderly fashion.  No talking will be allowed.  The object is to evacuate the building as quietly and orderly as possible.  The following procedure will be used unless given other last minute instructions by your teacher at the time of the alarm.  Line up facing the building and remain so until you hear the long bell, which indicates all clear at which time you will re-enter the building and return to your respective classes.

 

All teachers should follow their class out and when the safety area has been reached, make certain that all students are accounted for.  Make sure all windows are closed and doors shut.

 

1.         PE class will exit main door south to ball field.

2.         PolyCom room will exit southeast stage door turning south to ball field.

3.         At-Risk/Health room will exit south door of room to northeast stage door turning south to ball field.

4.         Art room will exit through northeast stage door turning south to ball field.

5.         Business room will exit the main door south to ball field.

6.         Resource room will exit the northeast stage door turning south to ball field.

7.         Weight room will exit building heading south to the ball field.

8.         Lower Math room will exit classroom door and continue through west exit doors south to ball field.

9.         Upper Math room will exit the south door at the east end of the hallway then south to the ball field.

10.       Social Studies room will exit the south door at the east end of the hallway then south to the ball field.

11.       Sixth Grade will exit classroom door turning left in main hallway, exit the south door at the east end of the hallway then south to the ball field.

12.       Cafeteria will exit the single door in the east side of the room, continue east around the building and south to the ball field.

13.       Upper English room will exit the south door at the east end of the hallway then south to the ball field.

14.       Library will exit library turning left through the west exit doors south to the ball field.

15.       Music will exit music room turning left to the west exit doors south to the ball field.

16.       Science will exit science room turning right through the west exit doors south to the ball field.

17.       Lower English room will exit classroom door turning right through west exit doors south to ball field.

 

TORNADO DRILL

As a safety precaution, and in accordance with the Missouri State School Laws, tornado drills will be held during the school year.  The TORNADO DRILL WILL BE ANNOUNCED OVER THE TELEPHONE INTERCOM system followed by a SERIES OF SHORT BELLS.  All students will go to designated areas in a quiet and orderly manner.  Students and teachers will move to shelter in the following order:

 

LOWER WING RESTROOMS     BOYS LOCKER ROOM        GIRLS LOCKER ROOM                                                              TEACHER WORKROOM

(a)Music                                   P.E.                                   Upper English                    Upper Math
(b)Lower Math                        Business                            Social Studies
(c)Library                                Art                                    PolyCom                           

Lower English                          Resource                                                                      PAT ROOM

(d)Science                                At-Risk                                                                        6th Grade
(e)                                             Weight Room                                                                     Cafeteria

 

                                                                                                                       

EARTHQUAKE EMERGENCY PLAN

An earthquake strikes without warning; therefore the teacher or person in charge should direct the students to get under their desk or a table and cover their heads.  If they can't do this, they should get against a wall away from windows and falling objects.  Students should be reminded to stay as calm as possible and listen for instructions. 

 

If the students are in the lunchroom, in special classes like art, remedial, music, library, etc., get under the table.  If in the bathroom, get in the doorway.  If you are outside, stay in an open area away from the building and power lines.  Do not try to come back in the building until you are instructed to do so.

 

When the earthquake is over, the principal or head teacher will give a signal, a loud blow of a whistle, for evacuation of the building.  If for any reason the principal or head teacher, cannot make teachers and pupils receive his evaluation alert, the teacher will have students wait two minutes and proceed on their own.  Follow the procedure out of the building as for fire drill -- first making sure that way is safe.

 

The teacher will see that students will not run aimlessly and blindly out of the building.  There is always danger of electrical wires, falling debris, and gas leaks that cause fires.

 

TEACHERS TAKE ROLL IMMEDIATELY ON REACHING DESIGNATED AREA!

 

TEACHER ALERT INSTRUCTIONS

In some instances teachers may need to be alerted about an emergency situation or an event taking place.  The TEACHER ALERT WILL BE ANNOUNCED OVER THE TELEPHONE INTERCOM system followed by a SHORT-SHORT-LONG-SHORT-SHORT LONG series of bells.  All teachers should then check their e-mail section for the alert.

 

HOTLINE

Your safety at school is a top priority for us.  If you are aware of a situation that jeopardizes the safety of anyone at school, immediately notify a member of the school staff or your parent/guardian.  If you are uncomfortable bringing this situation to the attention of an adult you know, call the Missouri School Violence Hotline at 866-748-7047.  Your call may be anonymous.


ATTENDANCE POLICIES

 

All students are expected to attend school regularly and to be on time for classes in order to get maximum benefit from the instructional program and to develop habits of punctuality, self-discipline, and responsibility.  There is felt to be a direct relationship between poor attendance, class failure, and dropouts.  The following are items comprising the attendance policy of the Adair County R-II Schools.  Revised by the Adair County R-II School Board on June 19, 2013.

 

1.         Students may miss no more than 7 days or the equivalent of 7 school days to receive any "credit" during a given semester for all classes enrolled.  Students may miss no more than 7 periods of any one class to receive "credit" for that class. 

2.         "Credit" will be defined as 1/2 unit of Carnegie credit per class each semester.  Any student exceeding 7 days in a semester will forfeit the 1/2 unit of credit for each class and have placed on their official transcript the letters "NC" (no credit) under the column "semester grade".  Also, the "NC" will be footnoted with an explanation of the school's attendance policy and loss of credit.

3.         College Visit allowances: Juniors will be allowed 1 college visit and Seniors will be allowed 2 college visits per year that will not count towards their 7 absences.  Visits must be arranged through the counselor, be pre-approved, and bring back documentation in order for them not to count towards their 7 days.

4.         The only exception to the attendance policy is a doctor, dentist, or orthodontist certified medical excuse, or mandatory courtroom appearance documented by the court or law firm.  Excused absences are based on the honesty and integrity of the parents and their doctor.   

5.         Make-up of missed work, tests, etc.:  It is the student's responsibility to obtain all homework and hand it in on time.  One day will be allowed for each day missed.  For example, if you are sick for 2 days with the flu, you have 2 days to make up the work.  Exceptions for late work can be made at the teacher’s discretion.  Truants will not be allowed to do make-up work.  Students must bring a note from home, for any absence, in order to be given credit for make-up work.  Assignments given or tests announced prior to an absence are due upon the students return to school.

6.         After the 4th day of absence in any of the 7 class periods a letter will be sent to the parent or guardian to inform them of the student’s absences.  After the 6th day of a student's absence the parent or guardian will be contacted by phone or letter (if phone contact is not possible).  After the 7th day of absence a certified letter will be sent notifying the parent or guardian of their student’s status.  After the 8th day of absence a certified letter will be sent to the parent or guardian notifying the individual of the Adair County R-II School's attendance policy and their child's status. 

7.         Student tardiness will be reported and recorded on an hourly basis for each school day.  Students who accumulate eight tardies in a semester will receive a detention for the first offense. On the 12th tardy, the student will serve a day of ISS.  On the 15th tardy, the student will serve 1-3 days of ISS.  On the 16th tardy and over, each tardy will receive 1-3 days of ISS. 

8.         Any student who exceeds 7 absences for any reason will make up each absence (in excess of 7 absences) minute for minute to receive credit for the semester.  The time can be made up before or after school or Saturday school as arranged by the Principal.  All make-up hours will be approved on a case by case basis.  

 

The attendance policy is for grades 7-12, but because of the importance of regular attendance it is recommended that all students adhere to the policy.  Students grades K-6 who exceed the attendance policy may be referred to the Juvenile authorities.

 

 

CORPORAL PUNISHMENT

STUDENTS    Policy 2670

Corporal Punishment: Authorized

Corporal punishment should be used only after other methods have failed and when there is reason to believe it will be helpful in maintaining discipline or in the development of the student's character and power of self‑control. All instances of corporal punishment shall be witnessed by at least one other adult member of the school staff and will only be administered by a principal or other District administrator.

 

DISCIPLINE

The District has the authority to control student conduct which is prejudicial to good order and discipline in the schools as provided by state law.  School officials are authorized to hold students accountable for misconduct in school, on school property, during school-sponsored activities and for conduct away from school or in non-school activities which affect school discipline.

 

Students forfeit their right to a public school education by engaging in conduct prohibited in Regulation 2610 and related provisions.  Disciplinary consequences include, but are not limited to, withdrawal of school privileges (athletics, intramurals, student clubs and activities and school social events); the reassignment of the student to another school; removal for up to ten (10) school days by school principals; extension of suspensions for a total of 180 days by the Superintendent; and longer term suspension and expulsion from school by the Board of Education.

 

STUDENT DISCIPLINE

Behavioral Expectations

The discipline code set out in this regulation is intended to be illustrative but not an exclusive listing of acts of misconduct and the consequences for each. Misconduct which is not specifically listed in this regulation may be deemed to warrant discipline up to and including expulsion following provision of all due process procedures. In addition, the disciplinary consequence listed for each offense may be increased or decreased by the Administration or the Board of Education due to mitigating or aggravating circumstances.  This code includes, but is not necessarily limited to, acts of students on school playgrounds, parking lots, school buses or at a school activity whether on or off school property.

 

Copies of this regulation as well as the District's corporal punishment policy will be provided to each student at the beginning of each school year. Copies of these documents will also be available for public inspection during normal business hours in the Superintendent's office.

 

Academic Dishonesty – Academic dishonesty is defined as copying from another student or allowing another         student to copy work, using or possessing a “crib sheet,” using an electronic device to cheat, looking in            a book during a closed-book test, and/or plagiarizing an assignment or project.

            First Offense:  Zero on the assignment, project, or test and one detention.

 Subsequent Offenses:  Zero on the assignment, project, or test and in-school suspension, or 1-180 days  out-of-school suspension.

 

 

Alcohol - Possession of or presence under the influence of alcohol

First Offense: 1-180 days out-of-school suspension, possible notification to law enforcement of   officials, and documentation in student’s discipline record.

Subsequent Offenses: Expulsion, possible notification to law enforcement officials, and documentation  in student’s discipline record.

Arson - Intentionally causing or attempting to cause a fire or explosion

First Offense: 11-180 days out-of-school suspension or expulsion, notification to law enforcement of  officials, and documentation in student’s discipline record.

Subsequent Offenses: Expulsion, notification to law enforcement officials, and documentation in  student’s discipline record.

Assault - (Refer to Policy and Regulation 2673 – Reporting of Violent Behavior)

a.   Attempting to cause injury to another person; placing a person in reasonable apprehension of imminent physical injury; physically injuring another person.

First Offense: In-school suspension, 1-180 days out-of-school suspension, or expulsion, possible  notification to law enforcement of officials, and documentation in student’s discipline record.

Subsequent Offenses: 11-180 days out-of-school suspension or expulsion, notification to law  enforcement officials, and documentation in student’s discipline record.

b.   Attempting to kill or cause serious physical injury to another; killing or causing serious physical injury to another.

First Offense: Expulsion, notification to law enforcement officials, and documentation in student’s  discipline record.                                                                                

c.   Fighting—Mutual combat in which both parties have contributed to the conflict either verbally or by physical action.

First Offense: Principal/Student conference, in-school suspension, or 1-180 days out-of-school  suspension, or expulsion, and possible documentation in student’s discipline record*.

Subsequent Offenses: In-school suspension, 1-180 days out-of-school suspension, or expulsion, and  possible documentation in student’s discipline record*.

Automobile/Vehicle Misuse—Driving and parking on school property are privileges granted by the Board of          Education to persons who have reasons to be in the schools or on school property.  Students are       expected to use all acceptable courtesies and safe driving practices on and around school property.     Building principals shall establish rules and procedures necessary for the safe operation and parking of      automobiles, trucks, motorcycles and other vehicles on school property.  Students are not to move or be         in automobiles/vehicles during the school day without permission from school officials.  Failure to        follow these rules and procedures may result in suspension or revocation of driving and parking    privileges as well as other disciplinary action.

Bullying – The district is committed to maintaining a learning and working environment free of any form of     bullying or intimidation by students toward District personnel or students on school grounds, or school           time, at a school sponsored activity or in a school related context.  Bullying is the intentional action by           an individual or group of individuals to inflict physical, emotional or mental suffering on another   individual or group of individuals.

            Bullying occurs when a student:

·       Communicates with another by any means including telephone, writing or via electronic communications, intention to intimidate, or inflict physical, emotional, or mental harm without legitimate purpose, or

·       Physically contacts another person with the intent to intimidate or to inflict physical, emotional, or mental harm without legitimate purpose.  Physical contact does not require physical touching, although touching may be included.

·        Exhibits any unwanted aggressive behavior towards another person.

First Offense:  In-school suspension, 1-180 days out-of-school suspension or expulsion, possible  notification to law enforcement officials, and documentation in student’s discipline record.

Subsequent Offenses:  1-180 days out-of-school suspension, possible notification to law enforcement  officials, and documentation in student’s discipline record.

            *The Superintendent may reduce the length of suspension for elementary school students based upon   the facts in each case.

Bus Misconduct—Any offense committed by a student on a district-owned or contracted bus shall be     punished in the same manner as if the offense had been committed at the student’s assigned school.  In            addition, bus riding privileges may be suspended or revoked.

Cell Phones/Pagers - The use of cell phones in school poses increasing risks of school disruptions, bullying,             criminal activity, and academic dishonesty.  Student cell phones, digital cameras and similar electronic         devices shall be turned off and are not to be seen or heard during the instructional day and are banned      from dressing areas (home or away) at all times.

            First Offense:  1-3 days in-school suspension.

            Subsequent Offenses:  2-10 days in-school suspension.

            Students needing to call home on their cell phones must first get permission from the principal's office prior to displaying cell phone.

Defiance of Authority - Refusal to obey directions or defiance of staff authority (Including disrespectful   conduct or speech such as verbal, written or symbolic language or gesture directed at a staff member     that is rude, vulgar, defiant, or considered inappropriate to public settings.)

First Offense: Principal/Student conference, in-school suspension, or 1-10 days out-of-school  suspension.

Subsequent Offenses: In-school suspension, or 1-180 days out-of-school suspension, or expulsion, and  possible documentation in student’s discipline record*.

Disruptive Behavior - Conduct that has the intentional effect of disturbing education or the safe     transportation of a student including conduct or verbal, written, pictorial or symbolic language that          materially and substantially disrupts classroom work, school activities or school functions.

First Offense: Principal/Student conference, in-school suspension, or 1-10 days out-of-school  suspension.

Subsequent Offenses: In-school suspension, or 1-180 days out-of-school suspension, or expulsion, and  possible documentation in student’s discipline record*.                                                                       

Drugs/Controlled Substance

a.   Possession or presence under the influence of a controlled substance or substance represented to be a controlled substance while at school, on the school playground, on the school parking lot, a school bus or at a school activity whether on or off of school property.

First Offense: 1-180 days out-of-school suspension, notification to law enforcement of officials, and       documentation in student’s discipline record.

      Subsequent Offenses: Expulsion, notification to law enforcement officials, and documentation in 

            student’s discipline record.

b.   Sale of a controlled substance or substance represented to be a controlled substance while at school or at any of the locations described above.

First Offense: 1-180 days out-of-school suspension, notification to law enforcement of officials, and  documentation in student’s discipline record.

Subsequent Offenses: Expulsion, notification to law enforcement officials, and documentation in  student’s discipline record.

Extortion  - Verbal threats or physical conduct designed to obtain money or other valuables

First Offense: Principal/Student conference, in-school suspension, or 1-10 days out-of-school  suspension.

Subsequent Offenses: In-school suspension, or 1-180 days out-of-school suspension, or expulsion, and possible documentation in student’s discipline record*.

False Alarms – Tampering with emergency equipment, setting off false alarms, making false reports.

First Offense: Up to and including Principal/parent conference, in-school suspension, 1-180 days out- of-school suspension, or expulsion, and possible documentation in student’s discipline record*.

Subsequent Offenses: Up to and including in-school suspension, 1-180 days out-of-school suspension,  or expulsion, and possible documentation in student’s discipline record*.

 

Firearms and Weapons (Refer to Policy and Regulation 2620 – Firearms and Weapons in School)

            Possession of a firearm or weapon

a.  Possession or use of any instrument or device, other than those defined in 18 U.S.C. § 921, 18 U.S.C. § 930(g)(2) or § 571.010, RSMo., which is customarily used for attack or defense against another person; any instrument or device used to inflict physical injury to another person.

First Offense: In-school suspension, 1-180 days out-of-school suspension, or expulsion, possible  notification to law enforcement of officials, and documentation in student’s discipline record*.

Subsequent Offenses: 11-180 days out-of-school suspension or expulsion, notification to law  enforcement officials, and documentation in student’s discipline record.

b.   Possession or use of a firearm as defined in 18 U.S.C. § 921, or any instrument or device defined in § 571.010, RSMo., or any instrument or device defined as a dangerous weapon in 18 U.S.C. § 930(g)(2) .

First Offense: One calendar year suspension or expulsion, unless modified by the Board upon  recommendation by the superintendent, notification to law enforcement officials, and documentation in student discipline record.              

Harassment (Refer to Policy 2130 – Harassment)

First Offense: Principal/Student conference, in-school suspension, 1-180 days out-of-school  suspension, or expulsion, and possible documentation in student’s discipline record*.

Subsequent Offenses: In-school suspension, 1-180 days out-of-school suspension, or expulsion, and  possible documentation in student’s discipline record*.                                                   

Improper Display of Affection  - A public display of affection is defined as physical contact with another   person that gives the appearance of an intimate relationship or is an intimate act that is in view of            others and is inappropriate in a school setting.  It may include, but is not limited to any intimate    physical contact between two individuals such as embracing, kissing, intimate caressing or touching or     any combination of the above.  Students who engage in public displays of affection are subject to             referral for disciplinary action by the school administration as defined in the student handbook.  A good    rule to follow is that side-to-side handholding is permitted.

First Offense: Principal/Student conference, in-school suspension, or 1-180 days out-of-school  suspension, and possible documentation in student’s discipline record*.

Subsequent Offenses: In-school suspension, 1-180 days out-of-school suspension, or expulsion, and  possible documentation in student’s discipline record*.

Improper Language

Threatening Language-Use of verbal, physical or written threats to do bodily harm to person or  personal property.

First Offense: Principal/Student conference, in-school suspension, or 1-10 days out-of-school  suspension.

Subsequent Offenses: In-school suspension, 1-180 days out-of-school suspension, or expulsion, and  possible documentation in student’s discipline record*.

Use of Obscene or Vulgar Language- Language that depicts sexual acts, human waste, and 

blasphemous language

First Offense: Principal/Student conference, in-school suspension, or 1-10 days out-of-school  suspension.

Subsequent Offenses: In-school suspension, 1-180 days out-of-school suspension, or expulsion, and  possible documentation in student’s discipline record*.                                                               

Disruptive or Demeaning Language or Conduct – Use of hate language to demean other persons due to the       race, gender, disability, natural origin, or religious beliefs. This provision also includes conduct, verbal,       written, or symbolic speech that materially and substantially disrupts class, school activities,           transportation, or school functions.

First Offense: Principal/Student conference, in-school suspension, or 1-10 days out-of-school  suspension.

Subsequent Offenses: In-school suspension, 1-180 days out-of-school suspension, or expulsion, and possible documentation in student’s discipline record*.    

Inappropriate Sexual Conduct (Refer to Policy and Regulation 2130 - Harassment)

            Physical touching of another student in the area of the breasts, buttocks, or genitals

First Offense: In-school suspension, 1-180 days out-of-school suspension, or expulsion, and possible  documentation in student’s discipline record*.

Subsequent Offenses: In-school suspension, 1-180 days out-of-school suspension, or expulsion, and  possible documentation in student’s discipline record*.

            Use of sexually intimidating language, objects, or pictures.

First Offense: Principal/Student conference, in-school suspension, or 1-180 days out-of-school  suspension, or expulsion, and possible documentation in student’s discipline record*.     

Subsequent Offenses: In-school suspension, 1-180 days out-of-school suspension, or expulsion, and possible documentation in student’s discipline record*                                                                 

Indecent Exposure—Includes display of breasts, buttocks and genitals in a public location

First Offense: Principal/Student conference, in-school suspension, or 1-180 days out-of-school  suspension, or expulsion, and possible documentation in student’s discipline record*.

Subsequent Offenses: In-school suspension, 1-180 days out-of-school suspension, or expulsion, and  possible documentation in student’s discipline record*.

Technology Misconduct                                                                                                                   

a.   Attempting, regardless of success, to gain unauthorized access to a technology system or information; to use district technology to connect to other systems in evasion of the physical limitations of the remote system; to copy district files without authorization; to interfere with the ability of others to utilize district technology; to secure a higher level of privilege without authorization; to introduce computer “viruses,” “hacking” tools, or other disruptive/destructive programs onto or using district technology; or to evade or disable a filtering/blocking device.

First Offense: 1-180 days out-of-school suspension, suspension or loss of user privileges, possible  notification of law enforcement and documentation in student’s discipline record*.

Subsequent Offenses: 1-180 days out-of-school suspension, expulsion, suspension or loss of user  privileges, possible notification of law enforcement and documentation in student’s discipline record*.

Violation of the Board adopted “Acceptable Use Policy”, administrative procedures or netiquette  rules          governing student use of district technology.

First Offense: In-school suspension, 1-180 days out-of-school suspension, suspension or loss of user  privileges, possible notification of law enforcement and documentation in student’s discipline record*.

Subsequent Offenses: In-school suspension, 1-180 days out-of-school suspension, expulsion,  suspension or loss of user privileges, possible notification of law enforcement and documentation in student’s discipline record*.

Theft - Nonconsensual taking or attempt to take the property of another

First Offense: In-school suspension, 1-180 days out-of-school suspension, or expulsion, possible  notification to law enforcement officials, and possible documentation in student’s discipline record*.

Subsequent Offenses: 11-180 days’ out-of-school suspension, or expulsion, notification to law  enforcement officials, and documentation in student’s discipline record.

Tobacco - Possession or use of tobacco, tobacco products, or electronic cigarettes

a.   Possession of any tobacco products on school grounds, school transportation or at any school activity.

First Offense: Principal/Student conference or in-school suspension, confiscation of tobacco product,  possible notification of law enforcement officials.

Subsequent Offenses: In-school suspension, or 1-10 days out-of-school suspension, confiscation of  tobacco product, possible notification of law enforcement officials           

Use of any tobacco products on school grounds, school transportation or at any school activity.

First Offense: In-school suspension or 1-3 days out-of-school suspension, confiscation of tobacco  product, possible notification of law enforcement officials.

Subsequent Offenses: In-school suspension, or 1-10 days out-of-school suspension, confiscation of  tobacco product, possible notification of law enforcement officials

Truancy - Absent or tardy from class or classes without authorization (See also Policy and Regulation 2340 –      Truancy and Educational Neglect.)

            First Offense:  Principal/Student conference or 1-3 days in-school suspension.

            Subsequent Offenses:  3-10 days in-school suspension.

Vandalism - Intentional damage or attempt to damage property belonging to the staff, students, or the District.

First Offense: In-school suspension, 1-180 days out-of-school suspension, or expulsion, possible  notification to law enforcement officials, and possible documentation in student’s discipline record*.

Subsequent Offenses: 11-180 days’ out-of-school suspension, or expulsion, notification to law  enforcement officials, and documentation in student’s discipline record.

 

*Any offense which constitutes a “serious violation of the district’s discipline policy” as defined in Board policy PRF 2673 will be documented in the student’s discipline record.

(f) 

DISCRIMINATION AND HARRASSMENT 

OF STUDENTS & EMPLOYEES

The Adair County R-II School District is committed to an academic and work environment in which all students and employees are treated with dignity and respect.  Discrimination and harassment of students and employees, whether committed by supervisors, employees or students and regardless of whether the victim is an employee or student, will not be tolerated.

 

Inquires, complaints or grievances from students and their parents and employees regarding discrimination and harassment may be directed to:

Brent Doolin

205 W Dewey St

Brashear MO 53533

660-323-5272

Other offices dealing with these complaints:

Missouri Commission for Human Rights                  Equal Employment Opportunity Comm

Department of Labor & Industrial Relations             Robert A Young Federal Building

PO Box 1129, 3315 W Truman Blvd                         1222 Spruce St   Room 8.100

Jefferson City MO 65102-3325                                 St Louis MO 63103

573-751-3325                                                             314-539-7800 or 800-669-4000

www.dolir.state.mo.us/hr                                           www.eeoc.gov

 

US Department of Education                                     US Department of Justice

Office of Civil Rights                                                950 Pennsylvania Ave  NW

Lyndon Baines Johnson Department of Ed Bldg       Washington DC 20530-0001

400 Maryland Ave SW                                               202-353-1555

Washington DC 20202-1100                                      ASKDOJ@usdoj.gov

8010-421-3481

OCR@ed.gov

 

NO CHILD LEFT BEHIND COMPLAINT PROCEDURES

The Federal No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB), Title IX Part C. Sec. 9304(a)(3)(C) requires the Missouri Department of Elementary & Secondary Education (DESE) to adopt procedures for resolving complaints regarding operations of programs authorized under the Act, including Title I, Title II, Title III, Title IV (Part A), Title V, Title VI, and Title VII and Title IX, part C.

Who May File a Complaint:  Any local education agency (LEA), consortium of LEAs, organization, parent, teacher, or member of the public may file a complaint.

Definition of a Complaint: There are both formal and informal complaint procedures.

A formal complaint must be a written, signed statement that includes:

1. an allegation that a federal statute or regulation applicable to the state educational agency (SEA) or a local education agency (LEA) program has been violated,

2. facts, including documentary evidence that supports the allegation, and

3. the specific requirement, statute, or regulation being violated.

Alternatives for Filing Complaints:  It is federal and state intent that complaints are resolved at a level nearest the LEA as possible. As described below, formal complaints filed with the SEA will be forwarded to the appropriate LEA for investigation and resolution. Informal complaints made to the SEA will be subject of an initial investigation by the SEA, but will be forwarded to the LEA if a formal complaint evolves.

Specific guidelines about this complaint procedure can be requested in the superintendent’s office.

 

NON-DISCRIMINATION

Adair County R-II School does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age, or disabling condition.  This policy regards admission/access to treatment/employment in its programs and activities.  This notification is made to:  applicants for admission and employment; students; parents of elementary and secondary students; employees; sources of referral of applicants from admission and employment and all unions or professional organizations holding collective bargaining or professional agreements.

 

Any person having inquiries concerning the Adair County R-II Public Schools’ compliance with the laws and regulations implementing Title VI of the civil Rights Act of 1964 (Title VI), Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 (Title IX), the Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA), Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (Section 504), or Titles II and III of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) is directed to the applicable Compliance Coordinator below who has been designated by the Adair County R-II Schools to coordinate School District efforts to comply with the laws and regulations implementing Title IV, Title IX, the ADEA, Section 504, and the ADA.

 

The Adair County R-II School has established grievance procedures for persons unable to resolve problems arising under the statutes above.  The Compliance Coordinator for the applicable law, whose name is listed below, will provide information regarding those procedures upon request.

 

Any person who is unable to resolve a problem or grievance arising under the laws and regulations cited above may contact the Office for Civil Rights, Region VII, 8930 Ward Parkway, Suite 2037, Kansas City, MO 64114; phone (816) 268-0550.

The Nondiscrimination Compliance Coordinator

(Title VI, Title IX, ADEA, Section 504, and the ADA)

Shelly Shipman

205 West Dewey Street

Brashear, MO 63533

(660) 323-5272

 

 

TECHNOLOGY USAGE

Internet Usage

Personal Responsibility

Access to electronic research requires students and employees to maintain consistently high levels of personal responsibility.  The existing rules found in the District's Behavioral Expectations policy (Board Policy/Regulation 2610) as well as employee handbooks clearly apply to students and employees conducting electronic research or communication.

 

One fundamental need for acceptable student and employee use of District electronic resources is respect for, and protection of, password/account code security, as well as restricted databases files, and information banks.  Personal passwords/account codes may be created to protect students and employees utilizing electronic resources to conduct research or complete work.

 

These passwords/account codes shall not be shared with others; nor shall students or employees use another party's password except in the authorized maintenance and monitoring of the network.  The maintenance of strict control of passwords/account codes protects employees and students from wrongful accusation of misuse of electronic resources or violation of District policy, state or federal law.  Students or employees who misuse electronic resources or who violate laws will be disciplined at a level appropriate to the seriousness of the misuse.

 

Acceptable Use

The use of the District technology and electronic resources is a privilege, which may be revoked at any time. Staff and students are only allowed to conduct electronic network-based activities which are classroom or workplace related. Behaviors which shall result in revocation of access shall include, but will not be limited to: damage to or theft of system hardware or software; alteration of system hardware or software; placement of unlawful information, computer viruses or harmful programs on, or through the computer system; entry into restricted information on systems or network files in violation of password/account code restrictions; violation of other users' rights to privacy; unauthorized disclosure, use or dissemination of personal information regarding minors; using another person's name/password/account to send or receive messages on the network; sending or receiving personal messages on the network; and use of the network for personal gain, commercial purposes, or to engage in political activity.

 

Students and employees may not claim personal copyright privileges over files, data or materials developed in the scope of their employment, nor may students or employees use copyrighted materials without the permission of the copyright holder.  The Internet allows access to a wide variety of media.  Even though it is possible to download most of these materials, students and

staff shall not create or maintain archival copies of these materials unless the source indicates that the materials are in the public domain.

 

Access to electronic mail (E-mail) is a privilege and designed to assist students and employees in the acquisition of knowledge and in efficiently communicating with others.  The District E-mail system is designed solely for educational and work related purposes.  E-mail files are subject to review by District and school personnel.  Chain letters, "chat rooms" or Multiple User Dimensions (MUDs) are not allowed, with the exception of those bulletin boards or "chat" groups that are created by teachers for specific instructional purposes or employees for specific work related communication.

 

Students or employees who engage in "hacking" are subject to loss of privileges and District discipline, as well as the enforcement of any District policy, state and/or federal laws that may have been violated.  Hacking may be described as the unauthorized review, duplication, dissemination, removal, damage, or alteration of files, passwords, computer systems, or programs, or other property of the District, a business, or any other governmental agency obtained through unauthorized means.

 

To the maximum extent permitted by law, students and employees are not permitted to obtain, download, view or otherwise gain access to "inappropriate matter" which includes materials that  may be deemed inappropriate to minors, unlawful, abusive, obscene, pornographic, descriptive of destructive devices, or otherwise objectionable under current District policy or legal definitions.  Similarly, the use of any District computer to access sites which allow the user to conceal their objective of accessing inappropriate material is not permitted.  The District and school administration reserve the right to remove files, limit or deny access, and refer staff or students violating the Board policy to appropriate authorities or for other disciplinary action.

 

Internet Access

In compliance with the Children’s Internet Protection Act (“CIPA”), 47 U.S.C. § 254, the District uses technological devices designed to filter and block the use of any District computer with Internet access to retrieve or transmit any visual depictions that are obscene, child pornography, or “harmful to minors” as defined by CIPA and material which is otherwise inappropriate for District students.

Due to the dynamic nature of the Internet, sometimes Internet websites and web material that do not fall into these categories are blocked by the filter.  In the event that a District student or employee feels that a website or web content has been improperly blocked by the District’s filter and this website or web content is appropriate for access by District students, the process described below should be followed:

1.         Follow the process prompted by the District’s filtering software (or to remain anonymous, log in under log in name: 123anonymous) and submit an electronic request for access to a website, or:

2.         Submit a request, whether anonymous or otherwise, to the District’s Superintendent/the Superintendent’s designee.

3.         Requests for access shall be granted or denied within three days.  If a request was submitted anonymously, persons should either attempt to access the website requested after three days or log back in at 123anonymous to see the status of the request. 

4.         Appeal of the decision to grant or deny access to a website may be made in writing to the Board of Education.  Persons who wish to remain anonymous may mail an anonymous request for review to the Board of Education at the School District’s Central Office, stating the website that they would like to access and providing any additional detail the person wishes to disclose. 

5.         In case of an appeal, the Board of Education will review the contested material and make a determination. 

6.         Material subject to the complaint will not be unblocked pending this review process.

In the event that a District student or employee feels that a website or web content that is available to District students through District Internet access is obscene, child pornography, or “harmful to minors” as defined by CIPA or material which is otherwise inappropriate for District students, the process described set forth in Regulation 6241 should be followed.  

Adult users of a District computer with Internet access may request that the “technology protection measures” be temporarily disabled by the chief building administrator of the building in which the computer is located for lawful purposes not otherwise inconsistent with this Policy.

Privileges

The use of District technology and electronic resources is a privilege, not a right, and inappropriate use will result in the cancellation of those privileges.  All staff members and students who receive a password/account code will participate in an orientation or training course regarding proper behavior and use of the network.  The password/account code may be suspended or closed upon the finding of user misuse of the technology system or its resources.

 

Network Etiquette and Privacy

Students and employees are expected to abide by the generally accepted rules of electronic network etiquette.  These include, but are not limited to, the following:

1.               System users are expected to be polite.  They may not send abusive, insulting, harassing, or threatening messages to others.

2.               System users are expected to use appropriate language; language that uses vulgarities or obscenities, libels others, or uses other inappropriate references is prohibited.

3.               System users may not reveal their personal addresses, their telephone numbers or the addresses or telephone numbers of students, employees, or other individuals during E-mail transmissions.

4.               System users may not use the District's electronic network in such a manner that would damage, disrupt, or prohibit the use of the network by other users.

5.               System users should assume that all communications and information is public when transmitted via the network and may be viewed by other users.  The system administrators may access and read E-mail on a random basis.

6.               Use of the District's electronic network for unlawful purposes will not be tolerated and is prohibited.

 

Services

While the District is providing access to electronic resources, it makes no warranties, whether expressed or implied, for these services.  The District may not be held responsible for any damages including loss of data as a result of delays, non-delivery or service interruptions caused by the information system or the user's errors or omissions.  The use or distribution of any information that is obtained through the information system is at the user's own risk.  The District specifically denies any responsibility for the accuracy of information obtained through Internet services.

 

Security

The Board recognizes that security on the District's electronic network is an extremely high priority.  Security poses challenges for collective and individual users.  Any intrusion into secure areas by those not permitted such privileges creates a risk for all users of the information system.

 

The account codes/passwords provided to each user are intended for the exclusive use of that person.  Any problems, which arise from the user sharing his/her account code/password, are the responsibility of the account holder.  Any misuse may result in the suspension or revocation of account privileges.  The use of an account by someone other than the registered holder will be grounds for loss of access privileges to the information system.

 

Users are required to report immediately any abnormality in the system as soon as they observe it.  Abnormalities should be reported to the classroom teacher or system administrator.

 

The District shall use filtering, blocking or other technology to protect students and staff from accessing internet sites that contain visual depictions that are obscene, child pornography or harmful to minors.  The District shall comply with the applicable provisions of the Children's Internet Protection Act (CIPA), and the Neighborhood Internet Protection Act (NCIPA).

 

Vandalism of the Electronic Network or Technology System

Vandalism is defined as any malicious attempt to alter, harm, or destroy equipment or data of another user, the District information service, or the other networks that are connected to the Internet.  This includes, but is not limited to the uploading or the creation of computer viruses, the alteration of data, or the theft of restricted information.  Any vandalism of the District electronic network or technology system will result in the immediate loss of computer service, disciplinary action and, if appropriate, referral to law enforcement officials.

Consequences

The consequences for violating the District's Acceptable Use Policy include, but are not limited to, one or more of the following:

1.               Suspension of District Network privileges;

2.               Revocation of Network privileges;

3.               Suspension of Internet access;

4.               Revocation of Internet access;

5.               Suspension of computer access;

6.               Revocation of computer access;

7.               School suspension;

8.               Expulsion; or

9.               Employee disciplinary action up to and including dismissal.


 

CAREER AND COURSE PLANNING GUIDE

ADAIR COUNTY R-II HIGH SCHOOL

The decisions and choices you make as a student at Adair County R-II High School will have a profound and long-lasting effect on your future.  You are encouraged to make your own decisions and to be responsible for the consequences of them.

 

All students should develop a six-year plan according to their individual interests, abilities, and goals.  Each spring the student will study and adjust the six-year plan, using input from parents, teachers, counselors, and other resources.  Students should utilize career information in the Guidance Office and the library media center to aid in developing the six-year plan.  Information on careers, vocational-technical schools, scholarships, college entrance requirements, and other related data is available from the counselor, in the library media center, or online.  Please also see www.missouriconnections.org for your online six-year plan.  AGAIN THIS YEAR  THERE ARE PARENT LOG-INS FOR THIS SITE.  SEE MRS. GRISSOM TODAY.

 

Parent involvement is critical to the success of the student's six-year plan.  It is the responsibility of each student to read carefully all of the registration materials and requirements for graduation, and to be willing to live with choices made for the year.  Parents should be aware of the requirements and recommendations for their student's chosen pathway.  Also, parents should support the student and school by providing a proper study atmosphere at home and by maintaining good communications with school officials and teachers.

 

We challenge you to set high standards for yourself, select courses and organizations which will advance you toward those goals, attend classes daily, and work hard to achieve your goals.

 

ADAIR COUNTY R-II HIGH SCHOOL

Adair County R-II High School is accredited by the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education of Missouri.  It offers a four-year program for Missouri residents.  Non-residents may apply for admission by contacting the school administration; tuition payments are required for non-resident students.  The local Board of Education has set a graduation requirement of twenty-four (24) units of credit.

 

EQUAL EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES

Each student, being limited only by individual differences; should be given the opportunity to develop and achieve to the maximum extent possible.  Therefore, the school district will foster an educational environment that provides equal educational opportunities for all students.  Education programs, services, vocational opportunities and extracurricular activities will be designed to meet the varying needs of all students, and will not discriminate against any individual for reasons of race, creed, color, sex, national origin, economic status or disability.

 

PURPOSE OF THIS GUIDE

The purpose of this booklet is to provide assistance to students, parents, and counselors in developing the students' six-year sequence of high school classes and the first two years of post-secondary decisions.  Students should look at their interests, abilities, and talents to choose one of the six broad career pathways and then consider the possible careers in each pathway.  The intent is not for students to decide on a specific occupation for the rest of their lives, but to focus on a broader career path to help them select school course.


 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

Local Requirements                                     

Subject Area

Required

Language Arts

4

Math

3

Science

3

Social Studies (.5 Government)

3

Fine Arts (Art or Music)

1

Practical Arts (IA, Bus) (Computer 1)

1

Personal Finance

.5

Health

.5

Physical Education

1.5

Electives

6.5

Total

24

 

Diploma of Distinction Requirements

Subject Area

Required

Language Arts*

4

Math*

3

Science*

3

Social Studies* (.5 Government)

3

Additional Core (including Foreign Language & Fine Arts)

 

3

Fine Arts (Art or Music)*

1

Practical Arts (IA, Bus)

       (Computer 1)

1

 

Personal Finance

.5

Health

.5

Physical Education

1.5

Electives

3.5

Cumulative GPA

8.0

No F’s on Transcript

No F’s

Total

24

*Core and Fine Arts Classes allowed for Additional Core Classes

College Preparatory Studies Certificate Requirements

Subject Area

2010 +

Language Arts*

4

Math*

4

Science*

3

Social Studies*

3

Additional Core (including Foreign Language & Fine Arts)

3

Units of Credit to Graduate

25

Cum GPA in Core Subjects

8.0

Composite at or above on ACT

21

Math credits above Algebra I

2 out of 3

Science credits (Bio., Chem., Physics, etc.)

2 out of 3

Attendance Rate (cumulative grades 9-12)

95%

SIX YEAR EDUCATION AND CAREER PLAN

NAME:________________________________                   CLASS OF:___________________

Career Path:

___ Arts and Communication                                                ___ Human Services

___ Business Management and Technology             ___ Industrial Engineering and Technology

___ Health Services                                                   ___ Natural Resources and Agriculture

Grade 9:                                                                     Grade 10:

English___________________________                  English____________________________

Math_____________________________                 Math______________________________

Social Studies______________________                 Social Studies_______________________

Science___________________________                 Science____________________________

Health____________________________                 __________________________________

PE_______________________________                 __________________________________

_________________________________                  __________________________________

_________________________________                  __________________________________

_________________________________                  __________________________________

Total Credits:______________________                 Total Credits:_______________________

Post Secondary Plans: (circle)                                  Post Secondary Plans: (circle)

Work   Military    Technical School                         Work     Military     Technical School

Community College   College/University                 Community College            College/University

 

Grade 11:                                                                   Grade 12:

English___________________________                  English____________________________

Math_____________________________                 Math______________________________

Social Studies______________________                 Social Studies_______________________

Science___________________________                 Science____________________________

_________________________________                  __________________________________

_________________________________                  __________________________________

_________________________________                  __________________________________

_________________________________                  __________________________________

_________________________________                  __________________________________

Total Credits:______________________                 Total Credits:_______________________

Post Secondary Plans: (circle)                                  Post Secondary Plans: (circle)

Work   Military    Technical School                         Work     Military     Technical School

Community College   College/University                 Community College            College/University

 

Post Secondary Plans (5th and 6th years):  For Seniors to fill out.

Names of businesses, schools, military branches etc. you plan to attend/look in to:

1._______________________   2._________________________   3.______________________

 

Other options you are considering:

 

Coordinating Board for Higher Education

High School Core Curriculum Requirement

Course Descriptions

(Approved 10-14-94)

(Revised 3-2015)

 

ENGLISH - At least four units, one of which may be speech or debate, that emphasizes college preparatory composition, research skills, analysis of literature, and other content of comparable or greater rigor.

Examples of courses generally acceptable toward the four units: English or language arts I, II, III, and IV, literature courses, journalism (if writing intensive), speech and debate.  

Examples of unacceptable courses: emphasizes student publications, broadcast media, or theatre unless taught by a certified English teacher

 

MATHEMATICS - At least three units, high school level algebra and beyond, including algebra II.

Examples of courses generally acceptable toward the three units: -algebra I, plane geometry, algebra II, pre- calculus, trigonometry, analytic geometry, calculus and math analysis.  Applied mathematics II and applied mathematics III, developed by the Center for Occupational Research and Development (CORD), may each be counted as one unit beyond Algebra I.  Standard algebra courses that have been subdivided, e.g., algebra I is divided into algebra IA and IB, may be counted only as one course unit.

 Examples of unacceptable courses: computer math, computer programming, consumer math, computer science, pre-algebra, basic math, general math, terminal math, business math [and] accounting and applied mathematics I, developed by the Center for Occupational Research and Development (CORD).

 

SOCIAL STUDIES - At least three units, including American history and at least one semester of government.

 Examples of courses generally acceptable toward the three units: world history, American history, American government, civics, principles of democracy, economics, psychology, sociology, political science and geography.  Applied economics, developed by the Agency for Instructional Technology (AIT) may be counted as one unit of Social Science.

Examples of unacceptable courses: regional history, family living, family relations, marriage and family,   consumer education, and courses generally listed under "practical arts" or "human environmental science.

 

SCIENCE - At least three units (not including general science), selected from biology, chemistry, or physics, one of which is a laboratory course.

Examples of courses generally acceptable toward the three units: botany, zoology, anatomy and physiology, biology, chemistry and physics.  If taught for a full two years, applied biology/chemistry, developed by the Center for Occupational Research and Development (CORD), may be counted as two units of a laboratory science.  If applied biology/chemistry is taught for only one year, then it may be counted as one unit of a laboratory science –content area depends on curriculum covered and training of the instructor.  Principles of technology (PT I and/or PT 2), developed by the Center for Occupational Research and Development, may be counted as one unit of a laboratory science.

Examples of unacceptable courses: life science, physical science, and earth science if not taught at the high school level in a rigor comparable to biology, chemistry, or physics; also, consumer science, outdoor education and environmental studies.

 

SPECIFIED CORE ELECTIVES - Three units selected from foreign language (two units of one foreign language are strongly recommended) and/or combinations from two or more of the following course areas: English, mathematics, social studies, science, visual and performing arts.  A computer science course with a prerequisite of at least algebra I is permissible as a mathematics elective. State and/or international history courses are permissible as social studies electives.

 

 

BUSINESS EDUCATION / COMPUTERS

Computer Applications

This course will include proper keyboarding techniques, word processing skills, and proofreading/editing skills.  Students will be required to produce personal-business and business letters, standard and simplified memos, unbound reports, and two- and three- column tables.  Timed writings will be used to improve keyboarding speed and accuracy.  An office word processing simulation will be completed by the student.

Grade  9, 10, 11, 12

 

Personal Finance

This course will focus on business, personal and financial decisions.  Students will learn how our economy works and will comprehend their role in the system.  Students will learn money management, spending and credit and savings and investing skills.  Students will be provided the tools needed to make wise decisions about personal economic issues.

Grade 12

 

Vocational Business Technology

This course includes self-management and professionalism for students to improve stress-reducing skills, reliability, initiative, honesty and integrity.  Interpersonal skills for demonstrating leaderships and cooperative work skills are covered.  Communication skills for the formation of business correspondence will be covered.  Students are introduced to word processing, desktop publishing, spreadsheets, and electronic presentations through Microsoft Office and Aldus PageMaker.  Interviews, resumes, job seeking skills and work skills will be introduced and demonstrated during the class.

Grades 11, 12       Prerequisite: Computer Applications

 

Accounting I

This course involves the student to identify accounting careers, analyze and apply accounting concepts, and complete an accounting cycle for a sole proprietorship, partnership and a corporation.  Maintaining banking records, processing payroll, and completing an accounting simulation is also covered in this class.

Grades 11, 12                                                                                                                                                                                                                          Weighted

 

(g)Computer Science

This is a basic class in computer competency and literacy. It includes all of the basic concepts of computer literacy and competency as well as more advanced programming and media production topics.  This course is an excellent chance for advanced students to gain their computer literacy requirement while being allowed to explore more advanced topics as well. Students should have a strong math and science background as well as excellent writing skills.

Grades 10, 11, 12                               

 

COMMUNICATION ARTS

English 7

The seventh grade language arts class develops language skills, refines reading skills, introduces process writing skills, and provides opportunities to practice listening, speaking, and thinking skills.  In reading the focus is on practicing higher order thinking skills through reading and discussing novels.  In writing the focus in on writing narratives, informative essays, and argumentative essays.

 

English 8

The eighth grade language arts class refines language skills, reading skills, and process writing skills and provides opportunities to practice listening, speaking, and thinking skills.  In reading the focus is on refining higher order thinking skills through reading and discussing novels.  In writing the focus is on developing more cohesive narratives, informative essays, and argumentative essays.

 

Language Arts I

After reviewing the writing process, students in LA I will continue to refine writing and language skills as they collect and interpret data in a birthday research project and an interview project.  Literature emphasis is on the short story and the epic.  Continued grammar and usage study is based on the Daily Oral Grammar program.  Additional emphasis is placed on vocabulary development.

Grade 9

 

Language Arts II

All communication skills are prominent in this course.  Students will refine their analytical skills by identifying a social problem and exploring possible solutions.  10th graders will also explore influences on language and how verbal skills are needed for effective group performance.  In literature, JULLIUS CAESAR, KING ARTHUR, and poetry provide a basis of the study.

Grade 10                   Prerequisites: LA I

Language Arts III

In this course, students advance critical reading and literary analysis skills through a focus on literature. Composition skills are developed in various forms of writing, including essays, personal narrative, and creative writing.

Grade 11-12          Prerequisites: LA I, LA II

 

Career English

This course provides career-specific English and communication skills. There is a focus on vocabulary development, interpersonal communication skills, and technical reading and writing skills. Students complete a career preparation unit in which they research career options, create a resume, practice interview skills.

Grades 11-12      Prerequisites:  LA I, LA II

 

American Literature II

This course is a study of American literature from the late 19th century to the present, emphasizing reading, analysis, and evaluation of works by major authors, along with application of various literary criticisms. Extensive out of class reading is a requirement. The culminating assignment is a library-researched paper. This is a one-semester course.

Grades 11, 12      Prerequisite:  LA I and LA II                                                       Dual Credit          Weighted

 

Applied Communications and Journalism

This course is designed to provide the student with extended English and desktop publishing skills.  Students review grammar, spelling, punctuation, capitalization, number expressions, written, and editing skills.  Students develop news writing skills and computer skills.  The final project of the class is to publish an annual yearbook.

Grades 11, 12             Prerequisite: Computer Applications

 

Freshman College English

A course in effective communications, this includes a study of the English Language and accepted patterns of usage, analysis of challenging reading material, both fiction and non-fiction, the enrichment of the student’s stock of ideas and vocabulary, the improvement of reading techniques, writing, speaking and study habits.  Outside reading is a requirement.  The course teaches effective communication skills through writing and emphasizes the procedural stage of writing that includes prewriting, composing, revising, and editing.  This is a one-semester course.

Grades 11, 12              Prerequisite: LA I and LA II                                                       Dual Credit            Weighted

 

Exposition

The course content is devoted to study of formal and expository methods and style of writing, methods of research, introduction to inductive and deductive reasoning and an analytical study of the construction of essays.  These skills are taught through the process of selecting topics, developing outlines and thesis statements, organizing materials, and executing both rough and final drafts.  Outside reading and a library paper are course requirements.  This is a one-semester course.

Grades 11, 12               Prerequisite: Freshman College English                      Dual Credit            Weighted

 

(i)Public Speaking

This course studies the role of speaking in communication.  It attempts to increase the student’s effectiveness in communication in both formal and informal situations.  The course includes a study of the communication process, the role of the listener, methods of speech organization, information and persuasive techniques and effective delivery.  Considerable time will be spent examining the theoretical framework of public speaking as well as putting those theories into practice.  Practical application of public speaking techniques will be emphasized.  This course is designed to heighten the student’s public address skills as well as increase his/her confidence and feeling of ease when involved in a speaking situation.

Grades 11,12         Prerequisite:  LA I, and LA II                                                           Dual Credit            Weighted

 

FINE ARTS & FOREIGN LANGUAGE

Band

Band members study the fundamentals of tone production for their chosen instrument, pitch and rhythm reading, technical development, and the preparation of solo, small ensemble and full band arrangements.  Musical selections from all styles and periods are studied through rehearsal and performance.  Students participate in both marching and pep band and are afforded the opportunity to participate in other local, conference and district bands as well as district music festivals as members of small and large ensembles.  Elementary Band is a required prerequisite course.

Grades 7-12

 

Art 7 & 8

Students will be involved in discussions and art activities that emphasize art production.  Students will study selected famous artist and artwork.  Discussions will cover art history, interpretations and reactions to various artworks and critiques of projects.  Art projects will include two- and three-dimensional work, including drawing, painting, sculpture, and ceramics.

 

Design Theory

This is a basic art course in which the elements and principles of art are studied and employed in student art projects.  Students are given real life design problems to solve.  This is a one-semester course.

Grades 9, 10, 11, 12                       

 

Fiber Art

This course gives an overview of textiles and their importance.  Students do a variety of fiber arts projects, including weaving, bead weaving, batik, string art, basketry, and paper making.  This is a one-semester course.        Grades  9, 10, 11, 12                                                                                                                            

College Prep Art

This is a studio art history class that begins with cave art and progress through to modern art.  Famous artists, styles and trends are studied and students do artwork inspired by these styles. This is a one-semester course.

Grades 10, 11, 12                                                                                                                         

 

Three Dimensional Art

This is a studio art class in which techniques and methods for creating sculptures are studied and employed.  Students create a variety of sculptures using paper, wood, clay, papier-mâché, cardboard, and recycled materials.  Famous sculptors are studied.  This is a one-semester course. 

Grades 10, 11, 12

 

Drawing

This course primarily focuses on drawing from real life.  Learning to draw what is actually seen by the eye is the goal of this class.  Students are also given instruction in composition and shading.  This is a one-semester course. 

Grades 9, 10, 11, 12

 

Painting

This is a studio art class in which students use watercolors, tempera, acrylic, and oil paints to create their own paintings.  Emphasis is on composition, use of color and color schemes, and various painting styles.  This is a one-semester course. 

Grades 9, 10, 11, 12

 

Spanish I

This course is to help students attain proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing in the Spanish language.  General goals include communicating in a language other than English, gaining knowledge and understanding of other cultures, connecting with other disciplines and acquiring information, developing insight into the nature of language and culture, and participating in multilingual communities at home and around the world.  Grades 10, 11, 12                                                                                     

 

Spanish II

This course is a continuation of the program begun in Spanish I.  General goals remain the same.  Students will be using Spanish more, will experience more opportunities for creative self-expression both orally and written, and will read literary selections adapted form works of well-known Spanish authors. 

Grades 11, 12        Prerequisite:  Spanish I                                                                                   

 

Spanish III

This course is a continuation of the program begun in Spanish I and II.  General goals remain the same.  Students will be using Spanish more, will experience more opportunities for creative self-expression both orally and written, and will read literary selections adapted form works of well-known Spanish authors. 

Grades 12              Prerequisite:  Spanish I, Spanish II                                                                  

 

HEALTH & P.E.

Health 7, 8, & 9

This course is to prepare individuals to understand the aspects of health with emphasis on nutritional, mental, emotional and physical health and the relationship of the individual’s health to total well being in society.

 

Physical Education 7-12

Students will participate in a wide range of individual and group activities and games to help each child develop and maintain a suitable level of physical fitness and good health, become competent in management of the body and acquire useful physical skills, acquire desirable social skills, develop needed safety skills, and learn to enjoy wholesome recreational activities both as a participant and spectator.

 

Body Conditioning – 10-12

This activity class is designed to provide basic instruction in weight lifting techniques and provide a program specific to student's goals and needs.  Students will develop weight lifting programs that will develop strength and help prevent injuries through weight training techniques and skills.

 

INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY

Industrial Technology 7 & 8

Students will learn basic hand tools and their safe and correct uses.  They will learn the basic leather craft tools and how to use them correctly.  Students will use the skills they learn by making a leather and wood project.  In IT 8, students will continue their leather tooling skills.  Students will also learn basic woodworking skills.  Students will use the skills they are learning by making leather and wood projects.

 

Exploratory Industrial Technology I

Students will build upon the skills previously learned in seventh and eighth grade.  Students will study drafting and design, wood, metal and plastic technology, and electricity.  Students will apply skills by doing drawings and making projects.

Grades 9, 10, 11, 12

Drafting

Students will learn a variety of techniques used to represent ideas and objects.  Students will get a good understanding of working and architectural drawings.  Students will develop skills while doing many drawings. Grades 11, 12

 

Metals

Students will learn about the common techniques and processes involved in the metals industries.  This will be accomplished through classroom activities, demonstrations, and individual projects.

Grades 10, 11, 12

 

Carpentry

Students will learn basic terms and techniques used in the carpentry industry.  Students will develop carpentry skills in the lab by working on projects.

Grades 10, 11, 12

 

Home Improvement

Students will learn many ways to keep their home and car in good shape.  Students will study basic plumbing, electrical, carpentry, dry-wall, door, and window repairs.  Students will develop skills in lab.

Grades 10, 11, 12

 

Woods

Students will learn the science of woods.  They will learn how to safely use various wood working machines.  The students will familiarize themselves with the machines, tool and machine processes, and steps of procedure while working on projects.

Grades 10, 11, 12

 

Advanced Woods

Students will have an in-depth study of the woodworking industry.  This course stresses the safe use of various woodworking machines.  Students will gain skills as they work on their own projects.

 

Electricity

This course offers the study of DC and AC circuits. Studies include energy, insulators, conductors, semiconductors and resistive components. Applications of magnetism are explored in the areas of generating electricity through the use of motors and generators. Students will gain hands-on experience in the use of electrical measurement equipment for basic circuit analysis. Inductance, capacitance and resonance of RCL circuits are also covered.  Students learn basic trouble-shooting and circuit repair skills.

MATHEMATICS

Mathematics 7 & 8

Topics covered include operations with real numbers, exponents, proportional and non-proportional relationships, algebra topics such as linear equations and functions, graphing, transformations, statistics, probability, and multiple geometry topics. The 7^th and 8^th grade math courses will focus on reading in math and problem solving. Skills will be reinforced by frequent review. Activities will be incorporation as necessary to help students develop conceptual knowledge. Daily assignments will often include writing in mathematics because by writing about mathematics, students clarify their own thinking and practice communicating mathematical ideas to others.

 

Integrated Math I

This course is designed to strengthen Algebra skills and problem solving before moving into upper level math.  This course is designed for those students needing a stronger base of mathematics knowledge before moving into an upper level math.   Grades 9, 10, 11, 12

 

Integrated Math II

This course is a continuation of Integrated Math I and those skills.  Students will continue to improve their math knowledge base to prepare them to move into Geometry or Algebra II.

Grades 10, 11, 12  Prerequisite:  Integrated Math I

 

Algebra I

Algebra I is the first mathematics course where arithmetic is not the main focus.  The Algebra I course focuses instead on the language of mathematics and problem solving.  Conversion of real-world problems from everyday language into the form of a mathematical equation is a key step in the problem solving process.  The main emphasis is on solving linear equations and simple quadratic equations and associated word problems.   Grades 9, 10, 11, 12

 

Geometry

Geometry is a course in mathematics that is used to teach higher level thinking skills.  Algebra I is a prerequisite.  The course is designed for the college bound student.  The major topics concern the characteristics of such geometric concepts as lines, angels, triangles and circles.  Importance is placed on understanding the properties of two-dimensional and three-dimensional figures and the area and volume of these figures.  Proficiency in thinking logically and drawing reasonable and valid conclusions, given a hypothesis, is a primary goal.

Grades 10, 11, 12      Prerequisite:  Algebra I

 

Algebra II

Algebra II extends the work of Algebra I in the conversion of real-world problems from everyday language into mathematical equations.  While review of solving linear equations is provided, the main emphasis is on solving quadratic equations and associated work problems.  Functions, inequalities, and algebraic proof are also included topics.    

Grades  10, II, 12         Prerequisite:  Algebra I                                                                              Weighted

 

Pre-Calculus

This course is designed to bridge the gap between Geometry /Algebra II and upper level courses such as Trigonometry and College Algebra or Calculus. Topic include a review of Algebra II, radical functions, exponential and log functions, basic trigonometry functions, matrices, sequences and series, and limits and derivatives. This course covers many of the topics seen on the ACT that students may not have studied in previous courses.

Grades  12             Prerequisite:  Algebra II/Geometry                                                                   Weighted

 

College Trigonometry

Topics include the wrapping function, circular functions, periodic functions, harmonic motion, symmetry, vectors and applications and the applications of the trigonometric functions to the sciences.  Prerequisite:  Algebra I & II and Geometry

Grade 12                               Prerequisite:  Algebra I & II                                                              Dual Credit                     Weighted

 

College Algebra

Topics include a review of basic algebra; various functions and their graphs, including polynomial and rational functions and exponential and logarithmic functions; and an introduction to analytic geometry.  The course includes systems of equations and inequalities.  Prerequisite:  Algebra I & II and Geometry.

Grade 12                               Prerequisite:  Algebra I & II                                                              Dual Credit                          Weighted

 

SCIENCE

Science 7 & 8

These two courses each consist of integrated science: life science, earth science and physical science are integrated in the form of topics which draw on each.  For example, one unit consists of 3 chapters.  The first chapter deals with the physical behavior of gases (physical science), such as how the pressure of a gas changes when its volume or temperature change.  A second chapter deals with the atmosphere (earth science) and how its composition varies, including the effects of air pollution.  The third chapter deals with breathing (life science) and how the lungs increase in volume to reduce pressure to draw air in (physical science) and how the lungs respond to pollutants (earth science).

 

Physical Science

Physical Science is divided into two parts.  During the first semester, students study topics in chemistry, including properties and states of matter, structure of atoms and the periodic table, chemical bonding and reactions and concluding with solutions, acids and bases.  During the remainder of the year, students transition to studying physics using a Physics First-style curriculum.  This approach uses science notebooking, hands-on experiments, graphing and a heavy emphasis on the scientific methods.  Topics include force and motion, sound and waves, and electricity and magnetism as time permits.

Grade 9

 

Biology

This course is a survey of life: its chemistry, ecology and diversity.  Topics include cells, genetics, microorganisms, fungi, plants, invertebrates and chordates.

 

Advanced Biology

This course is a study of zoology, the science of animals, and is subdivided into three sections. The first, cell physiology, focuses on proteins, complex carbohydrates, lipids and nucleic acids, including how each is made and functions inside the cell.  The second section is a survey of anatomy and physiology with an emphasis on human organ systems.  The third section covers different animal phyla, from sponges, worms, mollusks and arthropods through fishes, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals.

Grade 11, 12          Prerequisite:  Biology                                                         Dual Credit            Weighted

 

Chemistry

Topics covered include atomic structure, the periodic table, formation of compounds, chemical reactions, thermodynamics and acids and bases.  A strong emphasis is placed on quantitative relationships in chemical processes using math techniques.

Grades  11, 12                                                                                                                                              Dual Credit               Weighted

 

Physics

In this class is you better understand how things work and to appreciate the simple beauty of this world we live in.  Students will cover the basics of Newtonian mechanics, electricity & magnetism, waves, and a brief look at relativity. A strong math background is helpful, but the most important trait for success in this course is a desire to stretch your mind and a willingness to work with and learn from others.

Grade 11, 12          Prerequisite:  Algebra II or Geometry                                                              Weighted

 

 

SOCIAL STUDIES

Social Studies 7

Social studies seven encompasses the colonization of the United States up to and including the Civil War.  Course work also includes map work, reading and generating charts and graphs, and its history.  Course resources include the textbook, original source readings, cross-curricular and multi-cultural activities.

 

Civics 8

The eighth-grade class concentrates on the meaning of citizenship and the structure of local, state and federal governments.  The challenge of this class is to enable students to understand current events in their historical context.  Study of both the United States and Missouri constitutions is included to satisfy the Missouri State requirement under RSMO 170.011.

 

World History

Offered at the ninth grade level, world history concentrates on the challenges and achievements of various cultures around the world.  Emphasis is placed on the evolving nature of history, with an effort towards a greater appreciation of our own personal heritages and the accomplishments of various civilizations.  Maps, charts, and original source readings are incorporated in this class.

Grade 10

 

American History

Offered at the tenth grade level, American History 10 encompasses the history of the United States from 1865 to the present.  Course work includes map work, reading and generating charts and graphs.  Course resources include the textbook, original source readings, cross-curricular and multi-cultural activities.

Grade 9                                                              

 

Geography

Students will learn about world geography (both physical and political) through the study of culture and history.  Students will be expected to read and interpret maps and patterns, and participate in class discussions.

Grades 10, 11, 12

 

Government

A political science class that concentrates on local, state and federal government structure, this class offers the opportunity to gain the knowledge necessary to enter the adult world as informed citizens.  Attention will be given to the policy making process and to the roles of different government functions.  Attempts will be made to assess the extent to which government plays a part in the student’s own life.

Grades 10, 11, 12

 

1)Advanced Government

This course concentrates on local, state and federal government structure.  It provides an in-depth study of American government and politics with a focus on policymaking process and roles of different government functions.  The course will identify those major problems of American society that affect the policy making process.  This course will be an upper level course with an emphasis on writing, analyses, essays and higher order thinking strategies.

Grades 11, 12                                                     Dual Credit            Weighted



ARTS AND COMMUNICATIONS CAREER PATH

Occupations by Educational Requirements


 

     SCHOOL TO WORK/                TECHNICAL OR                FOUR YEAR COLLEGE

              MILITARY                  VOCATIONAL SCHOOL/              OR UNIVERSITY

   (No post-high school ed.)       COMMUNITY COLLEGE              (More than 2 years

                                                (2 years or less post-high school)               post-high school education)

Audio-Visual Specialist                  Artist                                     Writer                    Actor                                                            Architect

Compositor/Typesetter                   Broadcast Technician         Dancer                   Choreographer           Artist

Engraver                                            Commercial Artist               Designer                Composer

Floral Designer/Florist                    Custom Tailor                      Director                 Editor

Model                                                 Film Editor                           Drafter                   Public Relations Specialist

Motion Picture Projectionist          Graphic Artist                      Film Editor            Reporter/Correspondent

Musician                                            Interior Decorator               Photographer        Communications Manager

Professional Athlete                        Jeweler/Silversmith            Projectionist         Interpreter/Translator

Sign Painter/Letterer                        Merchandise Displayer                                      Journalist

                                                            Producer/Director                                               Music Director

                                                            Radio/TV Announcer                                         Newscaster

 

 

 

HEALTH SERVICES CAREER PATH

Occupations by Educational Requirements

 

SCHOOL TO WORK/                     TECHNICAL OR                FOUR YEAR COLLEGE

              MILITARY                  VOCATIONAL SCHOOL/              OR UNIVERSITY

   (No post-high school ed.)       COMMUNITY COLLEGE              (More than 2 years

                                                (2 years or less post-high school)  post-high school education)                       

Admitting Personnel                        Bio-Med.  Equipment Technician                    Audiologist        Surgeon

Nursing Assistant                             Dental Assistant                                                  Bio-Med Engineer        School

Physical Therapy Aide                    Emergency Medical Technician                       Chiropractor        Dentist

Technicians                                       Geriatric Aide                                                      Counselor

        Dental Laboratory                    Home Health Care Aide                                     Chemical Dependency

        Electrocardiograph                   Licensed Practical Nurse                                   Licensed Professional

        Medical Records                       Medical Assistant                                               Speech-Language Therapist

        Pharmacy                                   Medical Secretary                                               Creative Arts Therapist

Unit Clerk                                          Medical Transcriber                                           Respiratory Therapist

                                                            Respiratory Therapy Technician                      Executive Housekeeper

                                                            Surgical Technologist                                        Medical Records Admin.

                                                                                                                                           Nutritionist/Dietician

                                                                                                                                           Occupational Therapist       

                                                                                                                                           Physical Therapist        Physician

                                                                                                                                           Pharmacist        Psychologist

                                                                                                                                           Physician Assistant        Registered Nurse

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BUSINESS MANAGEMENT AND TECHNOLOGY CAREER PATH

Occupations by Educational Requirements

 

SCHOOL TO WORK/                     TECHNICAL OR                FOUR YEAR COLLEGE

              MILITARY                  VOCATIONAL SCHOOL/              OR UNIVERSITY

   (No post-high school ed.)       COMMUNITY COLLEGE              (More than 2 years

                                                (2 years or less post-high school)  post-high school education)

Bank Teller             Truck Driver     Administrative Manager                            Accountant/Auditor        Buyer

Data Entry               Dispatcher         Clerical Supervisor                                     Budget Analyst                City Manager

Messenger               Meter Reader    Computer Operator                                     Consultant                                  Economist

Cashier                    Postmaster         Computer Programmer                               General Manager                                  Principal

Clerk                        Receptionist      Court Reporter               Credit Analyst    Mathematician                                  Statistician

Telephone Operator                           Credit Manager              Telegrapher         Chief Executive                                  Underwriter

Reservation and Ticket Agent          Stenographer                  Sales Manager    Computer Systems Analyst

Retail Sales Person                                                                      Data Communications Analyst                                  Education Administrator

Property/Real Estate Manager         Food Service Manager                                Wholesale and Retail Buyer

Typist/Word Processor                     Legal Secretary                                            Title Examiner/Searcher

Bill and Account Collector               Paralegal Assistant                                      Health Administrators

Tax Examiner/Revenue Agent         Safety and Corrections Manager              Management Analyst

Customer Service Representative   Real Estate Appraiser                                 Marketing/Advertising Manager

Office Manager                                  Restaurant Manager                                    Personnel Specialist

Bookkeeping/Accounting Clerk                                                                             Medical Records Administrator

Insurance Adjuster/Examiner                                                                                  Natural Resources Admin.

 

HUMAN SERVICES CAREER PATH

Occupations by Educational Requirements

 

SCHOOL TO WORK/                     TECHNICAL OR                FOUR YEAR COLLEGE

              MILITARY                  VOCATIONAL SCHOOL/              OR UNIVERSITY

   (No post-high school ed.)       COMMUNITY COLLEGE              (More than 2 years

                                                (2 years or less post-high school)  post-high school education)                       

Baker                    Bus Driver             Barber                          Chef                         Adult Education Teacher

Butcher                Dishwasher           Compliance Inspector                                                               Anthropologist     Coach

Chimney Sweep                                  Correctional Officer                                   Archaeologist                              Counselor

Child Care Aide/Worker                   Employment Interviewer                            Clergy/Priest/Minister/Rabbi

Waiter/Waitress Fire Fighter            Fire Fighter Supervisor                               Teacher                              Economist

Host/Hostess       Porter/Bell Hop    Fire Inspector             Police/Detective     Historian                              Judge/Lawyer

Janitor/Maid/Cleaner                        Flight Attendant         Teacher Substitute Librarian                              Political Scientist

Library Assistant                                                                     Funeral Director/Mortician                              College Faculty Member

Sports Officiator                                                                      Hairdresser/Cosmetologist                              Parole & Probation Officer

Masseur/Masseuse                             Legal Technician (Paralegal)                     Political Scientist                              Psychologist

Refuse Collector                                                                      Social Service Technician                              Social Worker       Sociologist

Service Station Attendant                 Substance Abuse Counselor                      Psychiatric Social Worker

Customer Service Clerk                    Teacher Aide                                                Urban & Regional Planner

Private Investigator


INDUSTRIAL AND ENGINEERING CAREER PATH

Occupations by Educational Requirements

SCHOOL TO WORK/                     TECHNICAL OR                FOUR YEAR COLLEGE

              MILITARY                  VOCATIONAL SCHOOL/              OR UNIVERSITY

   (No post-high school ed.)       COMMUNITY COLLEGE              (More than 2 years

                                                (2 years or less post-high school)  post-high school education)                       

Airport Utility Worker                      Air Traffic Controller                                                               Architect

Printer                  Truck Driver         Aircraft Mechanic                                       Engineer

Welder                 Carpenter               Aircraft Pilot                                                      Aerospace

Machinist            Surveyor                Ambulance Driver/Attendant                         Biomedical

Locksmith           Roofer                    Construction Inspector                                    Chemical

Taxi Driver          Chauffer                Drafter                         Electrician                    Civil

Operators             Blacksmith            Heating/Air Cond. Repairer                            Electrical

Carpet Installer   Upholsterer           Photographic Processor                                   Industrial

Bookbinder         Cement Mason      Power Plant Operator                                                  Mechanical

Bicycle Repairer                                                                      Production Supervisor                          Mining

Boilermaker/Operator                       Transportation Supervisor Mechanic            Nuclear

Construction Worker                         Technicians                                                       Petroleum

Bricklayer/Mason                                      Chemical                                               Geographer

TV Cable Installer                                     Civil Engineering                                 Solar Energy Systems

Sheet Metal Worker                                  Laser                                                      Designer

Sewing Machine Operator                        Robotics

Painter/Paperhanger                                  Telephone

Computer Maintenance

General Maintenance Repairer

Highway Maintenance Worker

Blasters/Explosives Worker

Locomotive/Rail Year Engineer

Automotive Body Repairer

Water/Sewage Treatment Operator

 

NATURAL RESOURCES CAREER PATH

Occupations by Educational Requirements

SCHOOL TO WORK/                     TECHNICAL OR                FOUR YEAR COLLEGE

              MILITARY                  VOCATIONAL SCHOOL/              OR UNIVERSITY

   (No post-high school ed.)       COMMUNITY COLLEGE              (More than 2 years

                                                (2 years or less post-high school)  post-high school education)                       

Forestry Worker        Farmer                       Agricultural Supervisor             Agricultural and Food Scientist

Animal Caretaker      Hunter/Trapper        Grain Elevator                            Agricultural Engineer                                      Agronomist

Livestock Worker      Logger                        Superintendent                           Forester/Conservation                                      Astronomer

Farm Machinery Operator                           Sports Turf Management           Fish and Game Warden                                      Biochemist

Agricultural Grader/Scorer                          Surveyor                                      Animal Scientist                                      Botanist

Nursery Worker/Manager                            Technologist                               Soil Conservationist         Chemist

Fish Hatchery Worker                                  Biochemistry                               Toxicologist                                      Scientist

Gardener/Grounds Keeper                           Microbiology                              Biological Scientist                                      Geneticist

General Farm Worker                                                                                         Environmental Analyst                                      Geologist

Pest Control Worker                                                                                           Geographer                                      Horticulturist

Agricultural Product Inspector                                                                          Geophysicist                                      Zoologist

Landscaper Gardener                                                                                                                                Landscape Artist      Meteorologist

Weather Observer                                                                                               Oceanographer                  Range Manager